General Use Regulations for National Wildlife Refuges

General Use Regulations for National Wildlife RefugesThere are 21 National Wildlife Refuges in California with hunting programs. General use regulations for National Wildlife Refuges depend on who manages the hunting program, which is usually determined by what species you’re allowed to hunt there. Here’s a few points to keep in mind, but we try to put in all together for each refuge (follow the links in the sections below).

  • Nine refuges are managed by the Department of Fish and Wildlife (“CDFW”) in cooperation with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (“USFWS”). For those, all visitors have to comply with general use rules for State wildlife areas. (The CDFW also has refuge-specific rules located at 14 CCR § 552.)
  • The others 12 locations are managed by the USFWS and involve hunting for migratory game birds, like ducks and geese. Most of the general hunting regulations are located in the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. (Refuge-specific are located at 50 CFR § 32.24.)
  • All 21 locations have refuge-specific hunting rules and procedures. See 50 CFR § 32.24.

National Wildlife Refuges Managed by the CDFW

There are nine national wildlife refuges with hunting programs managed by the CDFW. Follow the links for local rules that either add or further restrict general use rules for “wildlife areas,” plus those for hunting birds and mammals. See 14 CCR § 551(c) and (d) and 14 CCR § 552.

  1. Colusa National Wildlife Refuge
  2. Delevan National Wildlife Refuge.
  3. Kern National Wildlife Refuge.
  4. Merced National Wildlife Refuge.
  5. Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge.
  6. Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge.
  7. San Luis National Wildlife Refuge.
  8. Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge.
  9. Sutter National Wildlife Refuge.

National Wildlife Refuges Managed by the USFWS

There are 11 national wildlife refuge with hunting programs managed by the USFWS. In general, these locations offer hunting for migratory game birds. General rules are located in the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. However, each location has refuge-specific rules, most of which are located at 50 CFR § 32.24. These rules either add to or further restriction general hunting rules for all birds and mammals.

  1. Cibola National Wildlife Refuge. *
  2. Clear Lake National Wildlife Refuge.
  3. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge.
  4. Havasu National Wildlife Refuge. *
  5. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge.
  6. Imperial National Wildlife Refuge. *
  7. Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge.
  8. Modoc National Wildlife Refuge.
  9. Salinas River National Wildlife Refuge.
  10. San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge.
  11. Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge.
  12. Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge.

* Cibola, Havasu and Imperial are partially located in Arizona

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