80 California Migratory Bird Hunting Regulation for Waterfowl, Doves, Pigeon, Snipe, Crows, etc.

Here, we fetch federal and California migratory bird hunting regulations to hunt certain species of ducks, geese, doves, band-tailed pigeon, snipe, cootmoorhen, and crows. In addition to hunting public and private land, we retrieve regulations relating to seasons, bag limits, possession limits, and restrictions for use of firearms and equipment, and more. We organize them by Topic and Regulation, and including summaries and links to the text and our pages with definitions, maps, and other resources.

Warning shots!! Also, see our pages with hunter-friendly summaries of additional rules applicable to all Birds and only Game BirdsWaterfowl, and individual Species. Second, see our summary page of federal rules from the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Third, there might be other rules and regulations that apply, like criminal laws from the Penal Code and county ordinances. Fourth, always check the Fish & Game Commission website for any updates or additional rules. While the contents of this page is not legal advice, feel free to ask our Legal Labrador for help.


Topics for California Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

Here, we retrieve a list of topics from California migratory bird hunting regulations. For each topic, we include links to relevant regulations and our pages with definitions and related rules and hunter-friendly summaries.

  1. Birds, see Crows, Doves, Pigeons, Snipe, and Waterfowl.
  2. Cleaning, see 50 CFR § 20.41 [transport], 20.52 [export], and 20.63 [import]; 14 CCR § 251.7 [transport]; and Doves, Export, Import, Preservation Facility, Personal Abode, and Pigeons.
  3. Commercial Uses, see Waterfowl.
  4. Common Carriers, see 50 CFR §§ 20.39 [possession] and 20.44 [package markings]; FGC §§ 2346 [bag limits], 2347 [offers], 2348 [package markings], 2352 [taken out of season], and 2353 [import into California]; and Export, Import, and Transport below.
  5. Crows, see 50 CFR §§ 20.120.7120.72, and 20.73 [compliance with regulations], and 20.133 [hunting].
  6. Daily Bag Limits, see 50 CFR §§ 20.1120.24, and 20.35 [possession]; FGC §§ 20012346 [transport], and 2347 [transport]; 14 CCR §§ 251.7 [take], 252 [definition], and 502; and Possession.
  7. Definitions, see 50 CFR §§ 21.3 and 20.11FGC §§ 3500(b) [list of migratory game birds] and 3683 [list]; and 14 CCR § 252 and see 14 CCR § 502 [dark, Canada, and white geese; waterfowl zones, and special management areas].
  8. Disabled Hunters, see 50 CFR § 20.21.
  9. Donations & Gifts, see 50 CFR § 20.39 and FGC § 3080 [requirements].
  10. Doves, see CFR §§ 20.43 [cleaning], 20.61 [import], and 20.103 [hunting], and Identification of Species.
  11. Export, see 50 CFR §§ 20.1 [regulations],  20.51 [violations], 20.52 [cleaning], and 20.53 [package markings]; and FGC § 2350 [nonresidents].
  12. Falconry, see 50 CFR §§ 21.3 and 20.109, and 14 CCR § 502.
  13. Feathers, see 50 CFR § 20.92 [transport for personal use] and Waterfowl.
  14. Firearms & Ammunitions, see 50 CFR §§ 20.108 and 20.134 [ban on lead ammo].
  15. Home, see Personal Abode.
  16. Import, see 50 CFR §§ 20.1 [regulations], 20.61 [bag and possession limits], 20.62 [birds of another], 20.63 [cleaning], 20.64 [taken in foreign country], 20.65 [dressing requirements], and 20.66 [package markings]; FGC § 2353 [import requirements]; 14 CCR § 251.7 [declaration of entry]; and Transport.
  17. Juniors, see 16 U.S.C. 718a and 14 CCR § 502 [seasons].
  18. License & Stamps, see 16 U.S.C. 718a50 CFR §§ 20.2 and 20.20 [HIP]; FGC § 3700.1 [state duck hunting validation]; and Nonresidents.
  19. Live Birds, see Transport.
  20. National Wildlife Refuges, see 16 U.S.C. 668dd and 50 CFR § 20.2.
  21. Nonresidents, see FGC § 2350 [shipment].
  22. Permits, see 50 CFR § 20.92 [feathers and skins], Export, Import, Nonresidents, and Transport.
  23. Personal Abode, see 50 CFR §§ 20.11 [definitions], 20.25 [waste], 20.35 [possession], 20.36 [tags], 20.40 [tags], 20.43 [transport] and 20.63 [import]; and 14 CCR § 251.7 [transport].
  24. Picking Services, see 50 CFR § 20.36 [tagging procedures].
  25. Pigeon (band-tailed), see 50 CFR § 20.43 [cleaning], 20.61 [import], and 20.103 [hunting]; and Identification of Species.
  26. Possession, see 50 CFR §§ 20.1 [regulations], 20.3120.3220.34 [opening day], 20.36 [traveling], 20.37 [no tags], and 20.39 [ends]; and Bag Limits, Donations & Gifts, and Possession Limits.
  27. Possession Limits, see 50 CFR § 20.33 and 20.35 [bag limits]; FGC § 2001; 14 CCR § 251.7 [take] and 252 [definition]; and Donations & Gifts.
  28. Postal Service & Mail, see 50 CFR § 20.39 [possession], 20.44 [package markings],20.53 [export], and 20.66 [import]; FGC § 2349 [wild dead birds]; and Common Carriers, Export, Import, and Transport.
  29. Preservation Facilities, see CFR § 20.43 [cleaning], 50 CFR § 20.81 [tags], 50 CFR § 20.82 [records], and 50 CFR § 20.83 [inspections], and Processing, Preservation & Storage
  30. Processing, see 50 CFR §§ 20.36 [tagging procedures] and Cleaning.
  31. Regulations, see 16 U.S.C. 668dd50 CFR §§ 20.2 and 20.64 [foreign countries]; FGC §§ 200120022349 [dead birds], and 2353 [import]; and Export, Import, and Violations.
  32. Seasons, see 50 CFR §§ 20.11 [open], 20.22 [closed], 20.26 [emergency closures], 20.34 [opening day], and 20.100 [hunting]; FGC §§ 2001 and 2352 [no season]; 14 CCR § 258 [defines “season”], and Donations & Gifts and Seasons.
  33. Shooting hours, see 50 CFR § 20.23.
  34. Shipping, see Common Carriers, Export, Import, Postal Service & Mails, and Transport.
  35. Skins, see 50 CFR § 20.92 [transport for personal use].
  36. Snipe, see 50 CFR § 20.104.
  37. Special Management Areas, see 14 CCR § 502.
  38. Stamps, see License & Stamps.
  39. Storage Services, see 50 CFR § 20.36 [tagging procedures]; 14 CCR § 251.7 [bag and possession limits]; and Personal Abode.
  40. Tags, see 50 CFR §§ 20.35 [bag limits], 20.36 [procedures], 20.3720.4020.42 [birds of another], 20.64 [import], and 20.81 [preservation facilities]; 14 CCR § 251.7 [possession]; and Donations & Gifts.
  41. Take, see 50 CFR §§ 20.1 [regulations], 20.11 and 20.21 [methods of take it allows, prohibits, or restrict]; 14 CCR §§ 251 [vehicles] and 251.9 [computer-assist remotes]; and Falconry and Shooting Hours above.
  42. Taxidermy, see 50 CFR §§ 20.36 [tagging procedures], and 20.65 [import]; and 14 CCR § 251.7 [bag and possession limits].
  43. Transport, see 50 CFR §§ 20.1 [requirements], 20.25 [waste], 20.35 [bag limits], 20.36 [tagging procedures], 20.38 [live migratory game birds], 20.41 [illegal take], 20.42 [birds of another], 20.43 [cleaning], 20.91 [waterfowl feathers], and 20.100 [general prohibition]; FGC §§ 2345 [wild dead birds], 2349 [parcel post], 2351 [bird taken out of season], and 2352 [no season]; 14 CCR §§ 251.7 [bag and possession limits] and 251.8 [Indian reservations]; and Common Carriers, Export, Import, Nonresidents, Permits, Post Offices & Mails, Shipping, and Violations.
  44. Vehicles, see 14 CCR §§ 251 [restrictions] and 251.1 [harassment]; and  Common Carriers, Shipping, and Transport.
  45. Violations, see 50 CFR §§ 20.41 and 20.64 [import docs]; 50 CFR §§ 20.7120.72, and 20.73  [federal and State laws for take, possession, transport, and export of birds, including parts, nests, and eggs]; and Regulations above.
  46. Waste, see 50 CFR §§ 20.25 and 20.38.
  47. Waterfowl, see 16 U.S.C. 718a50 CFR §§ 20.61 [import], 20.91 [commercial use of feathers], and 20.105 [hunting]; and Feathers and Skins above.
  48. Waterfowl zones, see 14 CCR § 502.
  49. Weapons, see Take.

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California Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

Here, we fetch up a list of California migratory bird hunting regulations. We retrieve federal rules from the United States Code (USC §) and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), which is in Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 20 (50 CFR § 20). While federal rules are the controlling authority, California has additional or further restrictive rules in the Fish and Game Code  and Title 14 of the Code of Regulations.

United States Code

  1. 16 U.S.C. 718a (Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act of 1934) while taking migratory waterfowl, generally requires juniors over the age of 15 to carry a Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (commonly referred to as a “federal duck stamp“) with his or her signature written in ink across the face of the stamp, which must be affixed to the hunting license.
  2. 16 U.S.C. 668dd (National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966) requires compliance with general rules and area-specific rules when visiting national wildlife refuges.

Code of Federal Regulations

  1. 50 CFR § 20.1 generally allows take, possession, transport, export, import but only in compliance with restrictions, conditions, and requirements in Part 20 for migratory game birds, and Sections 20.71, 20.7220.73, and 20.133 for crows.
  2. 50 CFR § 20.2 incorporates additional rules from the (a) Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act of 1934, (b) the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, (c) California Fish and Game Code, and (d) Title 14 of the California Code of Regulations.
  3. 50 CFR § 21.3 definitions (e.g. resident Armed Forces and falconry).
  4. 50 CFR § 20.11 definitions (e.g. migratory game birds, seasons, bag limits, personal abode, baited area, and resident Canada geese).
  5. 50 CFR § 20.20 requires the CDFW to implement the Harvest Information Program (HIP) by asking hunter’s (a) how many ducks, geese, or doves taken in the previous year, (b) whether they hunted coot or snipe, and (c) whether they intent to hunt band-tailed pigeon.
  6. 50 CFR § 20.21 subject to exceptions, like accommodations for mobility-impaired hunters, generally prohibits (1) use of a shotgun (a) larger than 10-gauge, (b) capable of holding more than three shells, or (c) shell shot other than steel or other non-toxic or (2) use of any aircraft, bait, battery gun, boats under power, calls that are recorded or electronically amplified, drug, explosive, fish hook, live decoys, machine-gun, motor vehicles, net, pistol, poison, punt gun, rifle, “sinkbox,” snare, stupefying substance, swivel gun, or trap.
  7. 50 CFR § 20.22 generally prohibits taking during closed season.
  8. 50 CFR § 20.23 restricts shooting hours to 1/2 hour before sunrise until sunset.
  9. 50 CFR § 20.24 restricts take to one daily bag limit or aggregate daily bag limit.
  10. 50 CFR § 20.25 prohibits waste by requiring reasonable effort to retrieve dead and crippled birds, and maintain possession until reaching his or her lawful destination (e.g. personal abode).
  11. 50 CFR § 20.26 discretion to close seasons for emergencies (e.g. threat to bird populations).
  12. 50 CFR § 20.31 prohibits possession of birds taken in violation of Section 20.20 through 20.26 (e.g. taken during closed season).
  13. 50 CFR § 20.32 prohibits possession of freshly killed migratory game birds during the closed season.
  14. 50 CFR § 20.33 prohibits possession of more than the possession limit.
  15. 50 CFR § 20.34 prohibits possession of more than the daily bag limit on opening day of a season.
  16. 50 CFR § 20.35 prohibits possession, custody of, or transport more than a possession of more than a daily bag limit.
  17. 50 CFR § 20.36 except while traveling to or at the hunter’s personal abode, requires migratory bird tags (including for the purpose of picking, cleaning, processing, transport, storage, and taxidermy), including the hunter’s signature, kill date, and total number and species of birds.
  18. 50 CFR § 20.37 unless tagged per Section 20.36, prohibits possession or custody of migratory game birds of another.
  19. 50 CFR § 20.38 prohibits waste by requiring hunters to immediately kill wounded birds taken into the hunter’s possession, and prohibits transport of live birds.
  20. 50 CFR § 20.39 ends the hunters “possession” of migratory game birds when delivered to another person as a gift, post office, common carrier, or migratory bird preservation facility under consignment.
  21. 50 CFR § 20.40 prohibits receipt, possession, and donating of migratory game birds without tags per Section 20.36.
  22. 50 CFR § 20.41 prohibits transport of migratory game birds taken in violation of Section 20.20 through 20.26 (e.g. taken during closed season).
  23. 50 CFR § 20.42 prohibits transport of another person’s migratory game birds without tags per Section 20.36.
  24. 50 CFR § 20.43 prohibits transport of migratory game birds, except doves and band-tailed pigeon, unless the bird is identifiable with the head or one fully feathered wings remains attached until reaching personal abode or migratory bird preservation facility. (Under California law, doves must have a fully feathered wing attached and pigeon must be identifiable.)
  25. 50 CFR § 20.44 prohibits transport by Postal Service or common carrier unless the package or container has the name and address of the shipper and consignee, plus the number of each species.
  26. 50 CFR § 20.51 prohibits the export of migratory game birds taken in violation of Section 20.20 through 20.26 (e.g. taken during closed season).
  27. 50 CFR § 20.52 prohibits export unless the species is identifiable with the the bird is identifiable with the head or one fully feathered wings remains attached until out of the United States.
  28. 50 CFR § 20.53 prohibits export by Postal Service or common carrier unless the package or container has the name and address of the shipper and consignee, plus the number of each species.
  29. 50 CFR § 20.61 prohibits import in excess of the limitations stated for doves, pigeons, and waterfowl.
  30. 50 CFR § 20.62 prohibits import of migratory game birds belonging to another person.
  31. 50 CFR § 20.63 prohibits import of migratory game birds, unless the species is identifiable with the head or one fully feathered wings remains attached until reaching personal abode or migratory bird preservation facility. (In California, doves must have the wing attached.)
  32. 50 CFR § 20.64 prohibits import, possession or transport of migratory game birds killed in a foreign country without export permits, tags, or other documents required by the foreign country.
  33. 50 CFR § 20.65 except for (a) the purpose of taxidermy or (b) birds killed in Canada, prohibits import of migratory game birds unless the birds are dressed, drawn, and the head and feet are removed.
  34. 50 CFR § 20.66 prohibits import by Postal Service or common carrier unless the package or container has the name and address of the shipper and consignee, plus the number of each species.
  35. 50 CFR § 20.71 prohibits the take, possession, transport, export of migratory game birds, bird parts, nests, or eggs in violations of federal law.
  36. 50 CFR § 20.72 prohibits the take, possession, transport, export of migratory game birds, bird parts, nests, or eggs in violations of California law.
  37. 50 CFR § 20.73 prohibits the take, possession, transport, export of migratory game birds, bird parts, nests, or eggs in violations of the laws or a foreign county.
  38. 50 CFR § 20.81 prohibits a migratory bird preservation facility from taking custody of a migratory game bird without tags per Section 20.36. [_link to preservation facilities]
  39. 50 CFR § 20.82  requires a migratory bird preservation facility to maintain record as stated therein.
  40. 50 CFR § 20.83  requires a migratory bird preservation facility to allow record inspections during reason hours.
  41. 50 CFR § 20.91 allows the possession, purchase, sale, barter, and transport of a hunter’s waterfowl feathers for commercial purposes, like  for making fishing flies, bed pillows, and mattresses but prohibits purchase, sale, or barter (b) for millinery or ornamental use of the feathers or (b) mounted specimens.
  42. 50 CFR § 20.92 allows the possession, transport, shipment, import, or export of lawfully taken migratory game bird feathers and skins.
  43. 50 CFR § 20.100 generally prohibits hunting unless during an open season.
  44. 50 CFR § 20.101 provides hunting seasons, limits, and shooting hours in Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands.
  45. 50 CFR § 20.102 provides hunting seasons, limits, and shooting hours in Alaska.
  46. 50 CFR § 20.103 authorizes hunting for certain doves and pigeons.
  47. 50 CFR § 20.104 authorizes hunting for snipe.
  48. 50 CFR § 20.105 authorizes hunting for waterfowl, coot, and moorhen.
  49. 50 CFR § 20.108 prohibits possession of both a firearm and lead ammunition.
  50. 50 CFR § 20.109 generally allows use of falcons and raptors for hunting, subject to prohibitions, conditions, and restrictions for falconry.
  51. 50 CFR § 20.133 generally allows crow hunting per State regulations but limits the season; restricts hunting methods to firearms, bow and arrow, and falconry; and prohibits use of aircraft.
  52. 50 CFR § 20.134 sets standards for approving nontoxic shell shot and coating pursuant to ban on lead ammunition.

California Fish and Game Code

  1. FGC § 2001 requires compliance with seasons, bag limits, and possession limits.
  2. FGC § 2002 requires compliance California hunting regulations.
  3. FGC § 2345 makes Sections 2346-2371 applicable to dead wild birds.
  4. FGC § 2346 prohibits common carrier transport in excess of a person’s daily bag limit.
  5. FGC § 2347 prohibits offering more than a daily bag limit to a common carrier for transport.
  6. FGC § 2348 common carrier pack or container marking requirements.
  7. FGC § 2349 prohibits mailing wild dead birds by parcel post.
  8. FGC § 2350 prohibits shipment out of California except with a nonresident hunting license or CDFW permit.
  9. FGC § 2351 [no section].
  10. FGC § 2352 prohibits common carrier shipment of birds with no season.
  11. FGC § 2353 prohibits import unless legally taken and possessed outside of the State, and either handled by common carrier or a declaration is submitted before entry.
  12. FGC § 3039 __ add to topics generally prohibits purchase or sale of any bird or mammal found in the wild or inedible parts of a domestically reared game bird except (a) as allowed in Sections 3087 and 4303; (b) handicraft items and products made from (i) furbearing mammals, (ii) nongame mammals, (iii) shed antlers, (iv) antlers from domestically reared animals–but not whole antlers, heads, mounted antlers, or antlers in velvet.
  13. FGC § 3500(b) provides list of migratory game birds.
  14. FGC § 3683 list of migratory game birds.
  15. FGC § 3700.1 requires license and state duck hunting validation to hunt any migratory game bird except jacksnipe, coots, gallinules, western mourning doves, white-winged doves, and band-tailed pigeons.
  16. FGC § 3080 gifts and donations.

California Code of Regulations

  1. 14 CCR § 251 restricts use of motor-driven air and land vehicles.
  2. 14 CCR § 251.1 prohibits animal harassment.
  3. 14 CCR § 251.5 restricts possession period for daily bag and possession limits.
  4. 14 CCR § 251.7 (a) prohibits possession of a bird in excess of daily bag and possession limits except game birds with proper tags, as it provides, held for (i) transportation, (ii) cleaning, (iii) shipment, (iv) taxidermy, or (v) storage; (b) requires a fully feathered wing or head on all birds in possession or transport until (i) reaching the hunter’s “personal abode,” (ii) being prepared for immediate consumption, or (iii) delivered to a commercial preservation facility, except doves only require the wing; (c) requires a declaration of entry per FGC § 2353 when importing a migratory game bird; (d) prohibits post-season possession of more than a possession limit of migratory game birds.
  5. prohibits taking in excess of daily bag and possession limits, sets species identification requirements, requires import permit, prohibits possession of more than possession limit after season closes.
  6. 14 CCR § 251.8 conditions relating to Indian reservation.
  7. 14 CCR § 251.9 prohibits computer-assist remotes.
  8. 14 CCR § 252 defines “bag and possession limit.”
  9. 14 CCR § 258 defines “season” for taking resident game birds, migratory game birds, game mammals, and furbearing mammals
  10. 14 CCR § 354 __ add to topics (a) defines “bow” and excludes crossbows from definition of “archery equipment;” (b) restricts arrow and bolt sizes for hunting big game, (c) allows any arrow or crossbow bolt for taking migratory game birds, resident small game, furbearers, and nongame mammals except no arrow or bolt (i) with an explosive headpoisonous substance, or tranquilizers on any animal or (ii) without flu-flu fletching for taking pheasant or migratory game birds unless to take waterfowl sitting on the water from a boat per Section 507(a)(2); (d) prohibits shooting across public roads and highways; (e) requires minimum casting distance of 130 yards (except flu-flu fletching arrows); (f) prohibits crossbows for game birds and game mammals during archery seasons except with a Disabled Archer’s Permit; (g) prohibits possession of firearm while hunting during any archery season or with an archery-only tag; (h) prohibits ready-to-firearm bows and crossbows in or on a vehicle; (i) allows use of lighted nocks without directional be of lights as exception t o Section 2005; and (j) provides procedures for Disabled Archer’s Permit.
  11. 14 CCR § 502 (a) defines dark, Large Canada, and small Canada geese; (b) describes waterfowl zones and special management areas; (c) sets general, youth, and falconry seasons, bag limits, and possession limits.
  12. 14 CCR § 503 allows landowners to herd and kill migratory game birds with a permit from the CDFW.
  13. 14 CCR § 505 authorized hunting methods and prohibitions (e.g. electric calls and live decoys).
  14. 14 CCR § 506 sets shooting hours and exceptions (e.g. Morro Bay).
  15. 14 CCR § 507 provides authorized hunting methods of take.
  16. 14 CCR § 507.1 requires nontoxic shot with shotguns to take waterfowl, coot, and moorhen.
  17. 14 CCR § 507.5 prohibits use of a boat under motorized power to take migratory game birds.
  18. 14 CCR § 670(c) to engage in falconry, as it defines, requires (a) a falconry license and permit from the CDFW, as it provides; (b) compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act; (c) compliance with regulations for hunting for species of upland game birds, migratory game birds, resident small game mammals, nongame birds, and nongame mammals, including licenses, seasonsbag and possession limits, and hawking hours.

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California Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

Here, we fetch up the text of major California migratory bird hunting regulations from the United States Code, Code of Federal Regulations, and California Fish and Game Code, and Code of Federal Regulations.

16 U.S.C. 718a

Prohibition on Take

(a) Prohibition (1) In general Except as provided in paragraph (2), no individual who has attained the age of 16 years shall take any migratory waterfowl unless, at the time of the taking, the individual carries on the person of the individual a valid Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, validated by the signature of the individual written in ink across the face of the stamp prior to the time of the taking by the individual of the waterfowl. (2) Exception No stamp described in paragraph (1) shall be required for the taking of migratory waterfowl – (A) by Federal or State agencies; (B) for propagation; or (C) by the resident owner, tenant, or sharecropper of the property, or officially designated agencies of the Department of the Interior, for the killing, under such restrictions as the Secretary may by regulation prescribe, of such waterfowl when found damaging crops or other property.

(b) Display of stamp Any individual to whom a stamp has been sold under this subchapter shall, upon request, display the stamp for inspection to – (1) any officer or employee of the Department of the Interior who is authorized to enforce this subchapter; or (2) any officer of any State or political subdivision of a State authorized to enforce State game laws. (c) Other licenses Nothing in this section requires any individual to affix the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp to any other license prior to taking 1 or more migratory waterfowl.

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50 CFR § 20.1

Scope of regulations.

(a) In general. The regulations contained in this part relate only to the hunting of migratory game birds, and crows.

(b) Procedural and substantive requirements. Migratory game birds may be taken, possessed, transported, shipped, exported, or imported only in accordance with the restrictions, conditions, and requirements contained in this part. Crows may be taken, possessed, transported, exported, or imported only in accordance with subpart H of this part and the restrictions, conditions, and requirements prescribed in §20.133.

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50 CFR § 20.2

Relation to other provisions.

(a) Migratory bird permits. The provisions of this part shall not be construed to alter the terms of any permit or other authorization issued pursuant to part 21 of this subchapter.

(b) Migratory bird hunting stamps. The provisions of this part are in addition to the provisions of the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act of 1934 (48 Stat. 451, as amended; 16 U.S.C. 718a).

(c) National wildlife refuges. The provisions of this part are in addition to, and are not in lieu of, any other provision of law respecting migratory game birds under the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (80 Stat. 927, as amended; 16 U.S.C. 668dd) or any regulation made pursuant thereto.

(d) State Laws for the protection of migratory birds. No statute or regulation of any State shall be construed to relieve a person from the restrictions, conditions, and requirements contained in this part, however, nothing in this part shall be construed to prevent the several States from making and enforcing laws or regulations not inconsistent with these regulations and the conventions between the United States and any foreign country for the protection of migratory birds or with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, or which shall give further protection to migratory game birds.

(e) Migratory bird subsistence harvest in Alaska. The provisions of this part, except for paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, are not applicable to the regulations governing the migratory bird subsistence harvest in Alaska (part 92 of this subchapter) unless specifically referenced in part 92 of subchapter G of this chapter.

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50 CFR 21.3

Definitions.

In addition to definitions contained in part 10 of this chapter, and unless the context requires otherwise, as used in this part:

Armed Forces means the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and the National Guard of any State.

Bred in captivity or captive-bred refers to raptors, including eggs, hatched in captivity from parents that mated or otherwise transferred gametes in captivity.

Captivity means that a live raptor is held in a controlled environment that is intensively manipulated by man for the purpose of producing raptors of selected species, and that has boundaries designed to prevent raptors, eggs or gametes of the selected species from entering or leaving the controlled environment. General characteristics of captivity may include, but are not limited to, artificial housing, waste removal, health care, protection from predators, and artificially supplied food.

Conservation measures, as used in §21.15, means project design or mitigation activities that are reasonable from a scientific, technological, and economic standpoint, and are necessary to avoid, minimize, or mitigate the take of migratory birds or other adverse impacts. Conservation measures should be implemented in a reasonable period of time.

Falconry is caring for and training raptors for pursuit of wild game, and hunting wild game with raptors. Falconry includes the taking of raptors from the wild to use in the sport; and caring for, training, and transporting raptors held for falconry.

Hacking is the temporary release of a raptor held for falconry to the wild so that it must survive on its own.

Hybrid means any bird that results from a cross of genetic material between two separate taxa when one or both are listed at 50 CFR 10.13, and any progeny of those birds.

Imprint, for the purposes of falconry, means a bird that is hand-raised, from 2 weeks of age until it has fledged, and has identified itself with humans rather than its own species. An imprinted bird is considered to be so for its entire lifetime.

Livestock depredation area means a specific geographic location in which depredation by golden eagles has been recognized. The boundaries and duration of a livestock depredation area are declared by U.S.D.A. Wildlife Services or by a State governor.

Military readiness activity, as defined in Pub. L. 107-314, §315(f), 116 Stat. 2458 (Dec. 2, 2002) [Pub. L. §319 (c)(1)], includes all training and operations of the Armed Forces that relate to combat, and the adequate and realistic testing of military equipment, vehicles, weapons, and sensors for proper operation and suitability for combat use. It does not include (a) routine operation of installation operating support functions, such as: administrative offices; military exchanges; commissaries; water treatment facilities; storage facilities; schools; housing; motor pools; laundries; morale, welfare, and recreation activities; shops; and mess halls, (b) operation of industrial activities, or (c) construction or demolition of facilities listed above.

Population, as used in §21.15, means a group of distinct, coexisting, conspecific individuals, whose breeding site fidelity, migration routes, and wintering areas are temporally and spatially stable, sufficiently distinct geographically (at some time of the year), and adequately described so that the population can be effectively monitored to discern changes in its status.

Raptor means a migratory bird of the Order Accipitriformes, the Order Falconiformes, or the Order Strigiformes listed in §10.13 of this chapter, including the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

Resident Canada geese means Canada geese that nest within the lower 48 States and the District of Columbia in the months of March, April, May, or June, or reside within the lower 48 States and the District of Columbia in the months of April, May, June, July, or August.

Secretary of Defense means the Secretary of Defense or any other national defense official who has been nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

Service or we means the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior.

Significant adverse effect on a population, as used in §21.15, means an effect that could, within a reasonable period of time, diminish the capacity of a population of migratory bird species to sustain itself at a biologically viable level. A population is “biologically viable” when its ability to maintain its genetic diversity, to reproduce, and to function effectively in its native ecosystem is not significantly harmed. This effect may be characterized by increased risk to the population from actions that cause direct mortality or a reduction in fecundity. Assessment of impacts should take into account yearly variations and migratory movements of the impacted species. Due to the significant variability in potential military readiness activities and the species that may be impacted, determinations of significant measurable decline will be made on a case-by-case basis.

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50 CFR § 20.11

What terms do I need to understand?

For the purpose of this part, the following terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean and to include:

50 CFR § 20.11(a)

Migratory game birds means those migratory birds included in the terms of conventions between the United States and any foreign country for the protection of migratory birds, for which open seasons are prescribed in this part and belong to the following families:

(1) Anatidae (ducks, geese [including brant] and swans);

(2) Columbidae (doves and pigeons);

(3) Gruidae (cranes);

(4) Rallidae (rails, coots and gallinules); and

(5) Scolopacidae (woodcock and snipe).

A list of migratory birds protected by the international conventions and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act appears in §10.13 of this subchapter.

50 CFR § 20.11(b)

(1) Open season means the days on which migratory game birds may lawfully be taken. Each period precribed as an open season shall be construed to include the first and last days thereof.

(2) Closed season means the days on which migratory game birds shall not be taken.

50 CFR § 20.11(c)

(1) Aggregate bag limit means a condition of taking in which two or more usually similar species may be bagged (reduced to possession) by the hunter in predetermined or unpredetermined quantities to satisfy a maximum take limit.

(2) Daily bag limit means the maximum number of migratory game birds of single species or combination (aggregate) of species permitted to be taken by one person in any one day during the open season in any one specified geographic area for which a daily bag limit is prescribed.

(3) Aggregate daily bag limit means the maximum number of migratory game birds permitted to be taken by one person in any one day during the open season when such person hunts in more than one specified geographic area and/or for more than one species for which a combined daily bag limit is prescribed. The aggregate daily bag limit is equal to, but shall not exceed, the largest daily bag limit prescribed for any one species or for any one specified geographic area in which taking occurs.

(4) Possession limit means the maximum number of migratory game birds of a single species or a combination of species permitted to be possessed by any one person when lawfully taken in the United States in any one specified geographic area for which a possession limit is prescribed.

(5) Aggregate possession limit means the maximum number of migratory game birds of a single species or combination of species taken in the United States permitted to be possessed by any one person when taking and possession occurs in more than one specified geographic area for which a possession limit is prescribed. The aggegate possession limit is equal to, but shall not exceed, the largest possession limit prescribed for any one of the species or specified geographic areas in which taking and possession occurs.

50 CFR § 20.11(d)

Personal abode means one’s principal or ordinary home or dwelling place, as distinguished from one’s temporary or transient place of abode or dwelling such as a hunting club, or any club house, cabin, tent or trailer house used as a hunting club, or any hotel, motel or rooming house used during a hunting, pleasure or business trip.

50 CFR § 20.11(e)

Migratory bird preservation facility means:

(1) Any person who, at their residence or place of business and for hire or other consideration; or

(2) Any taxidermist, cold-storage facility or locker plant which, for hire or other consideration; or

(3) Any hunting club which, in the normal course of operations; receives, possesses, or has in custody any migratory game birds belonging to another person for purposes of picking, cleaning, freezing, processing, storage or shipment.

50 CFR § 20.11(f)

Paraplegic means an individual afflicted with paralysis of the lower half of the body with involvement of both legs, usually due to disease of or injury to the spinal cord.

50 CFR § 20.11(g)

Normal agricultural planting, harvesting, or post-harvest manipulation means a planting or harvesting undertaken for the purpose of producing and gathering a crop, or manipulation after such harvest and removal of grain, that is conducted in accordance with official recommendations of State Extension Specialists of the Cooperative Extension Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

50 CFR § 20.11(h)

Normal agricultural operation means a normal agricultural planting, harvesting, post-harvest manipulation, or agricultural practice, that is conducted in accordance with official recommendations of State Extension Specialists of the Cooperative Extension Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

50 CFR § 20.11(i)

Normal soil stabilization practice means a planting for agricultural soil erosion control or post-mining land reclamation conducted in accordance with official recommendations of State Extension Specialists of the Cooperative Extension Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture for agricultural soil erosion control.

50 CFR § 20.11(j)

Baited area means any area on which salt, grain, or other feed has been placed, exposed, deposited, distributed, or scattered, if that salt, grain, or other feed could serve as a lure or attraction for migratory game birds to, on, or over areas where hunters are attempting to take them. Any such area will remain a baited area for ten days following the complete removal of all such salt, grain, or other feed.

50 CFR § 20.11(k)

Baiting means the direct or indirect placing, exposing, depositing, distributing, or scattering of salt, grain, or other feed that could serve as a lure or attraction for migratory game birds to, on, or over any areas where hunters are attempting to take them.

50 CFR § 20.11(l)

Manipulation means the alteration of natural vegetation or agricultural crops by activities that include but are not limited to mowing, shredding, discing, rolling, chopping, trampling, flattening, burning, or herbicide treatments. The term manipulation does not include the distributing or scattering of grain, seed, or other feed after removal from or storage on the field where grown.

50 CFR § 20.11(m)

Natural vegetation means any non-agricultural, native, or naturalized plant species that grows at a site in response to planting or from existing seeds or other propagules. The term natural vegetation does not include planted millet. However, planted millet that grows on its own in subsequent years after the year of planting is considered natural vegetation.

50 CFR § 20.11(n)

Resident Canada geese means Canada geese that nest within the lower 48 States and the District of Columbia in the months of March, April, May, or June, or reside within the lower 48 States and the District of Columbia in the months of April, May, June, July, or August.

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50 CFR § 20.20

Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program.

(a) Information collection requirements. The collections of information contained in §20.20 have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. and assigned clearance number 1018-0015. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The information will be used to provide a sampling frame for the national Migratory Bird Harvest Survey. Response is required from licensed hunters to obtain the benefit of hunting migratory game birds. Public reporting burden for this information is estimated to average 2 minutes per response for 3,300,000 respondents, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Thus the total annual reporting and record-keeping burden for this collection is estimated to be 112,000 hours. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing the burden, to the Service’s Information Collection Clearance Officer at the address provided at 50 CFR 2.1(b).

(b) General provisions. Each person hunting migratory game birds in any State except Hawaii must have identified himself or herself as a migratory bird hunter and given his or her name, address, and date of birth to the respective State hunting licensing authority and must have on his or her person evidence, provided by that State, of compliance with this requirement.

(c) Tribal exemptions. Nothing in paragraph (b) of this section shall apply to tribal members on Federal Indian Reservations or to tribal members hunting on ceded lands.

(d) State exemptions. Nothing in paragraph (b) of this section shall apply to those hunters who are exempt from State-licensing requirements in the State in which they are hunting.

(e) State responsibilities. The State hunting licensing authority will ask each licensed migratory bird hunter in the respective State to report approximately how many ducks, geese, doves, and woodcock he or she bagged the previous year, whether he or she hunted coots, snipe, rails, and/or gallinules the previous year, and, in States that have band-tailed pigeon hunting seasons, whether he or she intends to hunt band-tailed pigeons during the current year.

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50 CFR § 20.21

What hunting methods are illegal?

Migratory birds on which open seasons are prescribed in this part may be taken by any method except those prohibited in this section. No persons shall take migratory game birds:

(a) With a trap, snare, net, rifle, pistol, swivel gun, shotgun larger than 10 gauge, punt gun, battery gun, machinegun, fish hook, poison, drug, explosive, or stupefying substance;

(b) With a shotgun of any description capable of holding more than three shells, unless it is plugged with a one-piece filler, incapable of removal without disassembling the gun, so its total capacity does not exceed three shells. However, this restriction does not apply during:

(1) A light-goose-only season (greater and lesser snow geese and Ross’ geese) when all other waterfowl and crane hunting seasons, excluding falconry, are closed.

(2) A Canada goose only season when all other waterfowl and crane hunting seasons, excluding falconry, are closed in the Atlantic, Central, and Mississippi Flyway portions of Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as set forth below:

(i) During the period of September 1 to September 15, when approved in the annual regulatory schedule in subpart K of this part; and

(ii) During the period of September 16 to September 30, when approved in the annual regulatory schedule in subpart K of this part.

(c) From or by means, aid, or use of a sinkbox or any other type of low floating device, having a depression affording the hunter a means of concealment beneath the surface of the water;

(d) From or by means, aid, or use of any motor vehicle, motor-driven land conveyance, or aircraft of any kind, except that paraplegics and persons missing one or both legs may take from any stationary motor vehicle or stationary motor-driven land conveyance;

(e) From or by means of any motorboat or other craft having a motor attached, or any sailboat, unless the motor has been completely shut off and/or the sails furled, and its progress therefrom has ceased: Provided, That a craft under power may be used to retrieve dead or crippled birds; however, crippled birds may not be shot from such craft under power except in the seaduck area as permitted in subpart K of this part;

(f) By the use or aid of live birds as decoys; although not limited to, it shall be a violation of this paragraph for any person to take migratory waterfowl on an area where tame or captive live ducks or geese are present unless such birds are and have been for a period of 10 consecutive days prior to such taking, confined within an enclosure which substantially reduces the audibility of their calls and totally conceals such birds from the sight of wild migratory waterfowl;

(g) By the use or aid of recorded or electrically amplified bird calls or sounds, or recorded or electrically amplified imitations of bird calls or sounds. However, this restriction does not apply during:

(1) A light-goose-only season (greater and lesser snow geese and Ross’ geese) when all other waterfowl and crane hunting seasons, excluding falconry, are closed.

(2) A Canada goose only season when all other waterfowl and crane hunting seasons, excluding falconry, are closed in the Atlantic, Central, and Mississippi Flyway portions of Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as set forth below:

(i) During the period of September 1 to September 15, when approved in the annual regulatory schedule in subpart K of this part; and

(ii) During the period of September 16 to September 30, when approved in the annual regulatory schedule in subpart K of this part.

(h) By means or aid of any motordriven land, water, or air conveyance, or any sailboat used for the purpose of or resulting in the concentrating, driving, rallying, or stirring up of any migratory bird;

(i) By the aid of baiting, or on or over any baited area, where a person knows or reasonably should know that the area is or has been baited. However, nothing in this paragraph prohibits:

(1) the taking of any migratory game bird, including waterfowl, coots, and cranes, on or over the following lands or areas that are not otherwise baited areas—

(i) Standing crops or flooded standing crops (including aquatics); standing, flooded, or manipulated natural vegetation; flooded harvested croplands; or lands or areas where seeds or grains have been scattered solely as the result of a normal agricultural planting, harvesting, post-harvest manipulation or normal soil stabilization practice;

(ii) From a blind or other place of concealment camouflaged with natural vegetation;

(iii) From a blind or other place of concealment camouflaged with vegetation from agricultural crops, as long as such camouflaging does not result in the exposing, depositing, distributing or scattering of grain or other feed; or

(iv) Standing or flooded standing agricultural crops where grain is inadvertently scattered solely as a result of a hunter entering or exiting a hunting area, placing decoys, or retrieving downed birds.

(2) The taking of any migratory game bird, except waterfowl, coots and cranes, on or over lands or areas that are not otherwise baited areas, and where grain or other feed has been distributed or scattered solely as the result of manipulation of an agricultural crop or other feed on the land where grown, or solely as the result of a normal agricultural operation.

(j)(1) While possessing loose shot for muzzle loading or shotshells containing other than the following approved shot types.

***

(2) Each approved shot type must contain less than 1 percent residual lead (see §20.134).

(3) This shot type restriction applies to the taking of ducks, geese (including brant), swans, coots (Fulica americana), and any other species that make up aggregate bag limits with these migratory game birds during concurrent seasons in areas described in §20.108 as nontoxic shot zones.

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50 CFR § 20.22

Closed seasons.

No person shall take migratory game birds during the closed season except as provided in part 21 of this chapter.

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50 CFR § 20.23

Shooting hours.

No person shall take migratory game birds except during the hours open to shooting as prescribed in subpart K of this part and subpart E of part 21 of this chapter.

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50 CFR § 20.24

Daily limit.

No person shall take in any 1 calendar day, more than the daily bag limit or aggregate daily bag limit, whichever applies.

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50 CFR § 20.25

Wanton waste of migratory game birds.

No person shall kill or cripple any migratory game bird pursuant to this part without making a reasonable effort to retrieve the bird, and retain it in his actual custody, at the place where taken or between that place and either (a) his automobile or principal means of land transportation; or (b) his personal abode or temporary or transient place of lodging; or (c) a migratory bird preservation facility; or (d) a post office; or (e) a common carrier facility.

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50 CFR § 20.26

Emergency closures.

(a) The Director may close or temporarily suspend any season established under subpart K of this part:

(1) Upon a finding that a continuation of such a season would constitute an imminent threat to the safety of any endangered or threatened species or other migratory bird populations.

(2) Upon issuance of local public notice by such means as publication in local newspapers of general circulation, posting of the areas affected, notifying the State wildlife conservation agency, and announcement on local radio and television.

(b) Any such closure or temporary suspension shall be announced by publication of a notice to that effect in the Federal Register simultaneous with the local public notice referred to in paragraph (a)(2) of this section. However, in the event that it is impractical to publish a Federal Register notice simultaneously, due to the restriction in time available and the nature of the particular emergency situation, such notice shall follow the steps outlined in paragraph (a) of this section as soon as possible.

(c) Any closure or temporary suspension under this section shall be effective on the date of publication of the Federal Register notice; or if such notice is not published simultaneously, then on the date and at the time specified in the local notification to the public. Every notice of closure shall include the date and time of closing of the season and the area or areas affected. In the case of a temporary suspension, the date and time when the season may be resumed shall be provided by a subsequent local notification to the public, and by publication in the Federal Register.

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50 CFR § 20.31

Prohibited if taken in violation of subpart C.

No person shall at any time, by any means, or in any manner, possess or have in custody any migratory game bird or part thereof, taken in violation of any provision of subpart C of this part.

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50 CFR § 20.32

During closed season.

No person shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds during the closed season.

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50 CFR § 20.33

Possession limit.

No person shall possess more migratory game birds taken in the United States than the possession limit or the aggregate possession limit, whichever applies.

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50 CFR § 20.34

Opening day of a season.

No person on the opening day of the season shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds in excess of the daily bag limit, or aggregate daily bag limit, whichever applies.

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50 CFR § 20.35

Field possession limit.

No person shall possess, have in custody, or transport more than the daily bag limit or aggregate daily bag limit, whichever applies, of migratory game birds, tagged or not tagged, at or between the place where taken and either (a) his automobile or principal means of land transportation; or (b) his personal abode or temporary or transient place of lodging; or (c) a migratory bird preservation facility; or (d) a post office; or (e) a common carrier facility.

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50 CFR § 20.36

Tagging requirement.

No person shall put or leave any migratory game birds at any place (other than at his personal abode), or in the custody of another person for picking, cleaning, processing, shipping, transportation, or storage (including temporary storage), or for the purpose of having taxidermy services performed, unless such birds have a tag attached, signed by the hunter, stating his address, the total number and species of birds, and the date such birds were killed. Migratory game birds being transported in any vehicle as the personal baggage of the possessor shall not be considered as being in storage or temporary storage.

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50 CFR § 20.37

Custody of birds of another.

No person shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds belonging to another person unless such birds are tagged as required by §20.36.

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50 CFR § 20.38

Possession of live birds.

Every migratory game bird wounded by hunting and reduced to possession by the hunter shall be immediately killed and become a part of the daily bag limit. No person shall at any time, or by any means, possess or transport live migratory game birds taken under authority of this part.

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50 CFR § 20.39

Termination of possession.

Subject to all other requirements of this part, the possession of birds taken by any hunter shall be deemed to have ceased when such birds have been delivered by him to another person as a gift; or have been delivered by him to a post office, a common carrier, or a migratory bird preservation facility and consigned for transport by the Postal Service or a common carrier to some person other than the hunter.

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50 CFR § 20.40

Gift of migratory game birds.

No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a gift, except at the personal abodes of the donor or donee, unless such birds have a tag attached, signed by the hunter who took the birds, stating such hunter’s address, the total number and species of birds and the date such birds were taken.

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50 CFR § 20.41

Prohibited if taken in violation of subpart C.

No person shall at any time, by any means, or in any manner, transport any migratory game bird or part thereof, taken in violation of any provision of subpart C of this part.

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50 CFR § 20.42

Transportation of birds of another.

No person shall transport migratory game birds belonging to another person unless such birds are tagged as required by §20.36.

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50 CFR § 20.43

Species identification requirement.

No person shall transport within the United States any migratory game birds, except doves and band-tailed pigeons (Columba fasciata), unless the head or one fully feathered wing remains attached to each such bird at all times while being transported from the place where taken until they have arrived at the personal abode of the possessor or a migratory bird preservation facility.

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50 CFR § 20.44

Marking package or container.

No person shall transport by the Postal Service or a common carrier migratory game birds unless the package or container in which such birds are transported has the name and address of the shipper and the consignee and an accurate statement of the numbers of each species of birds therein contained clearly and conspicuously marked on the outside thereof.

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50 CFR § 20.51

Prohibited if taken in violation of subpart C.

No person shall at any time, by any means, or in any manner, export or cause to be exported, any migratory game bird or part thereof, taken in violation of any provision of subpart C of this part.

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50 CFR § 20.52

Species identification requirement.

No person shall export migratory game birds unless one fully feathered wing remains attached to each such bird while being transported from the United States and/or any of its possessions to any foreign country.

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50 CFR § 20.53

Marking package or container.

No person shall export migratory game birds via the Postal Service or a common carrier unless the package or container has the name and address of the shipper and the consignee and an accurate statement of the numbers of each species of birds therein contained clearly and conspicuously marked on the outside thereof.

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50 CFR § 20.61

Importation limits.

No person shall import migratory game birds in excess of the following importation limits:

(a) Doves and pigeons.

(1) From any foreign country except Mexico, during any one calendar week beginning on Sunday, not to exceed 25 doves, singly or in the aggregate of all species, and 10 pigeons, singly or in the aggregate of all species.

(2) From Mexico, not to exceed the maximum number permitted by Mexican authorities to be taken in any one day: Provided, That if the importer has his Mexican hunting permit date-stamped by appropriate Mexican wildlife authorities on the first day he hunts in Mexico, he may import the applicable Mexican possession limit corresponding to the days actually hunted during that particular trip.

(b) Waterfowl.

(1) From any foreign country except Canada and Mexico, during any one calendar week beginning on Sunday, not to exceed 10 ducks, singly or in the aggregate of all species, and five geese including brant, singly or in the aggregate of all species.

(2) From Canada, not to exceed the maximum number permitted to be exported by Canadian authorities.

(3) From Mexico, not to exceed the maximum number permitted by Mexican authorities to be taken in any one day: Provided, That if the importer has his Mexican hunting permit date-stamped by appropriate Mexican wildlife authorities on the first day he hunts in Mexico, he may import the applicable Mexican possession limit corresponding to the days actually hunted during that particular trip.


50 CFR § 20.62

Importation of birds of another.

No person shall import migratory game birds belonging to another person.

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50 CFR § 20.63

Species identification requirement.

No person shall import migratory game birds unless each such bird has one fully feathered wing attached, and such wing must remain attached while being transported between the port of entry and the personal abode of the possessor or between the port of entry and a migratory bird preservation facility.

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50 CFR § 20.64

Foreign export permits.

No person shall import, possess or transport, any migratory game birds killed in a foreign country unless such birds are accompanied by export permits, tags, or other documentation required by applicable foreign laws or regulations.

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50 CFR § 20.65

Processing requirement.

No person shall import migratory game birds killed in any foreign country, except Canada, unless such birds are dressed (except as required in §20.63), drawn, and the head and feet are removed: Provided, That this shall not prohibit the importation of legally taken, fully feathered migratory game birds consigned for mounting purposes to a taxidermist who holds a current taxidermist permit issued to him pursuant to §21.24 of this chapter and who is also licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to decontaminate such birds.

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50 CFR § 20.66

Marking of package or container.

No person shall import migratory game birds via the Postal Service or a common carrier unless the package or container has the name and address of the shipper and the consignee and an accurate statement of the numbers of each species of birds therein contained clearly and conspicuously marked on the outside thereof.

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50 CFR § 20.71

Violation of Federal law.

No person shall at any time, by any means or in any manner, take, possess, transport, or export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any act of Congress or any regulation issued pursuant thereto.

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50 CFR § 20.72

Violation of State law.

No person shall at any time, by any means or in any manner, take, possess, transport, or export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any applicable law or regulation of any State.

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50 CFR § 20.73

Violation of foreign law.

No person shall at any time, by any means, or in any manner, import, possess, or transport, any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird taken, bought, sold, transported, possessed, or exported contrary to any applicable law or regulation of any foreign country, or State or province thereof.

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50 CFR § 20.81

Tagging requirement.

No migratory bird preservation facility shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds unless such birds are tagged as required by §20.36.

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50 CFR § 20.82

Records required.

(a) No migratory bird preservation facility shall:

(1) Receive or have in custody any migratory game bird unless accurate records are maintained which can identify each bird received by, or in the custody of, the facility by the name of the person from whom the bird was obtained, and show (i) the number of each species; (ii) the location where taken; (iii) the date such birds were received; (iv) the name and address of the person from whom such birds were received; (v) the date such birds were disposed of; and (vi) the name and address of the person to whom such birds were delivered, or

(2) Destroy any records required to be maintained under this section for a period of 1 year following the last entry on the record.

(b) Record keeping as required by this section will not be necessary at hunting clubs which do not fully process migratory birds by removal of both the head and wings.

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50 CFR § 20.83

Inspection of premises.

No migratory bird preservation facility shall prevent any person authorized to enforce this part from entering such facilities at all reasonable hours and inspecting the records and the premises where such operations are being carried.

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50 CFR § 20.91

Commercial use of feathers.

Any person may possess, purchase, sell, barter, or transport for the making of fishing flies, bed pillows, and mattresses, and for similar commercial uses the feathers of migratory waterfowl (ducks, geese, brant, and swans) killed by hunting pursuant to this part, or seized and condemned by Federal or State game authorities, except that:

(a) No person shall purchase, sell, barter, or offer to purchase, sell, or barter for millinery or ornamental use the feathers of migratory game birds taken under authority of this part; and

(b) No person shall purchase, sell, barter, or offer to purchase, sell, or barter mounted specimens of migratory game birds taken under authority of this part.

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50 CFR § 20.92

Personal use of feathers or skins.

Any person for his own use may possess, transport, ship, import, and export without a permit the feathers and skins of lawfully taken migratory game birds.

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50 CFR § 20.100

General provisions.

(a) The taking, possession, transportation, and other uses of migratory game birds by hunters is generally prohibited unless it is specifically provided for under regulations developed in accordance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Consequently, hunting is prohibited unless regulatory schedules are established for seasons, daily bag and possession limits, and shooting (or hawking) hours. Migratory game bird population levels, including production and habitat conditions, vary annually. These conditions differ over North America, and within the United States, by flyways, States, and frequently areas within States. Thus, it is necessary to make annual adjustments in the schedules to limit the harvests of migratory game birds to permissible levels.

(b) The development of these schedules involves annual data gathering programs to determine migratory game bird population status and trends, evaluations of habitat conditions, harvest information, and other factors having a bearing on the anticipated size of the fall flights of these birds. The proposed hunting schedules are announced early in the spring, and following consideration of additional information as it becomes available, as well as public comment, they are modified and published as supplemental proposals. These are also open to public comment. Public hearings are held for the purpose of providing additional opportunity for public participation in the rulemaking process.

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50 CFR § 20.101

Seasons, limits and shooting hours for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

This section provides for the annual hunting of certain doves, pigeons, ducks, coots, gallinules and snipe in Puerto Rico; and for certain doves, pigeons and ducks in the Virgin Islands. In these Commonwealths, the hunting of waterfowl and coots (and other certain species, as applicable) must be with the use of nontoxic shot beginning in the 1991-92 waterfowl season.


50 CFR § 20.102

Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for Alaska.

This section provides for the annual hunting of certain waterfowl (ducks, tundra swans, geese, and brant), common snipe, and sandhill cranes in Alaska. In Alaska, the hunting of waterfowl must be with the use of nontoxic shot beginning in the 1991-92 waterfowl season.

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50 CFR § 20.103

Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons.

This section provides for the annual hunting of certain doves and pigeons in the 48 contiguous United States. The mourning dove hunting regulations are arranged by the Eastern, Central, and Western Management Units.

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50 CFR § 20.104

Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for rails, woodcock, and common (Wilson’s) snipe.

This section provides for the annual hunting of certain rails, woodcock, and snipe in the 48 contiguous United States.

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50 CFR § 20.105

Seasons, limits and shooting hours for waterfowl, coots, and gallinules.

This section provides for the annual hunting of certain waterfowl (ducks, geese [including brant]), coots and gallinules in the 48 contiguous United States. The regulations are arranged by the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central and Pacific Flyways. These regulations often vary within Flyways or States, and by time periods. Those areas of the United States outside of State boundaries, i.e., the United States’ territorial waters seaward of county boundaries, and including coastal waters claimed by the separate States, if not already included under the zones contained in §20.108, are designated for the purposes of §20.21(j) as nontoxic shot zones for waterfowl hunting beginning in the 1991-92 season.

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FGC § 2002

Taking and Possessing in General [2000 – 2022]

It is unlawful to possess a bird, mammal, fish, reptile, amphibian, or part of any of those animals, taken in violation of this code or a regulation adopted pursuant to this code.

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FGC § 2345

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

This article applies to all dead wild birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, and amphibians. This article also applies to live mollusks and crustaceans that are transported for purposes other than placement in the waters of this state. This article does not apply to animals imported for purposes of aquaculture under Division 12 (commencing with Section 15000).

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FGC § 2346

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

It is unlawful for a common carrier or his or her agent to transport for, or to receive for transportation from, any one person, during any interval of time, more than the bag limit of birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, or amphibians that may legally be taken and possessed by that person during that interval.

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FGC § 2347

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

It is unlawful for any person to offer for transportation by common carrier during any interval of time more than the bag limit of birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, or amphibians that may legally be taken and possessed by that person during that interval.

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FGC § 2348

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

(a) The outside of a package offered to or received by a common carrier or the carrier’s agent for transportation, or transported by a common carrier or agent, that contains a bird, mammal, fish, reptile, or amphibian, shall clearly and conspicuously indicate the following:

(1) The name and address of the shipper.

(2) The name and address of the consignee.

(3) The number and kind of bird, mammal, fish, reptile, and amphibian contained in the package.

(b) Licensed commercial fishermen and licensed commercial fish dealers are subject to all of the provisions of this section, except that commercial shipments of fish may be indicated by total net weight of each species instead of by numbers.

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FGC § 2349

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

No bird, mammal, fish, reptile, or amphibian, except smoked, cured, or dried fish other than trout, may be shipped by parcel post.

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FGC § 2350

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

It is unlawful to transport or carry a deer or game bird out of this state, except by the holder of a nonresident hunting license or under a written permit issued by the department.

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FGC § 2351

[No Section]


FGC § 2352

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

Except as permitted by this code, it is unlawful for any common carrier to transport any protected nongame bird, or to transport any resident or migratory game bird for which there is no open season.

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FGC § 2353

Importation and Transportation of Dead Birds, Mammals, Fish, Reptiles, and Amphibia [2345 – 2401]

(a) Birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, or amphibians shall not be imported or possessed in this state unless all of the following requirements are met:

(1) The animals were legally taken and legally possessed outside of this state.

(2) This code and regulations adopted pursuant thereto do not expressly prohibit their possession in this state.

(3) A declaration is submitted to the department or a designated state or federal agency at or immediately before the time of entry, in the form and manner prescribed by the department.

(b) Birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, or amphibians legally taken and legally possessed outside of this state may be imported into this state and possessed without a declaration if the shipment is handled by a common carrier under a bill of lading or as supplies carried into this state by common carriers for use as food for the passengers.

(c) The commission and the department shall not modify this section by any regulation that would prohibit the importation of lawfully killed migratory game birds taken in any other state or country and transported into this state pursuant to the migratory bird regulations adopted annually by the Secretary of the Interior.

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FGC 3080 

Possession of Birds and Mammals After Season [3080 – 3087]

Click here.

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FGC § 3500

See FGC §§ 3500(b) for list of migratory game birds.

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FGC § 3660

See FGC § 3683 re identity of pheasant carcass while in possession of a firearm.

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FGC § 3683 (California Bird__ Hunting Rules)

See FGC § 3683(b) for list of migratory game birds.

(b) All of the following migratory game birds:

(1) Jacksnipe.

(2) Western mourning doves.

(3) White-winged doves.

(4) Band-tailed pigeons.

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FGC § 3700.1

(a) It is unlawful for any person, except a person licensed pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 3031, to take any migratory game bird, except jacksnipe, coots, gallinules, western mourning doves, white-winged doves, and band-tailed pigeons, without first procuring a state duck hunting validation as provided in subdivision (b), and having that validation in his or her possession while taking those birds.

(b) State duck hunting validations shall be sold for a fee of ten dollars ($10) by the department and by license agents, who are authorized by the department pursuant to Section 1055.1, in the same manner as hunting licenses.

(c) This section applies only to licenses, permits, reservations, tags, and other entitlements issued through the Automated License Data System.

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14 CCR § 251

Prohibition on Pursuing or Shooting Birds and Mammals from Motor-Driven Air or Land Vehicles, Motorboats, Airboats, Sailboats or Snowmobiles.

Click here.

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14 CCR § 251.1

Harassment of Animals.

Click here.

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14 CCR § 251.5

Game Birds, Game Mammals, Furbearers and Nongame Animals, Possession Of.

(a) Migratory game birds may not be held beyond the period provided by the federal regulations and in accordance with the daily bag and possession limits prescribed by these regulations. (See section 500.)

(b) Live mountain lions may be possessed only under terms of a permit issued by the Department pursuant to section 2150 of the Fish and Game Code or if the owner can demonstrate that the mountain lion was in his/her possession on or before June 6, 1990 under a permit issued pursuant to section 3200 of said code.

(c) Every game bird, game mammal, furbearer or nongame animal taken under the authority of a hunting or trapping license and reduced to possession by the hunter or trapper shall be immediately killed and become a part of the daily bag limit.

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14 CCR § 251.7

See 14 CCR § 251.7.

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14 CCR § 251.8

Transportation of Game Birds and Game Mammals off Indian Reservations.

Click here.

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14 CCR § 251.9

Computer Assisted Remote Hunting.

(a) It is unlawful to take or assist in the taking of any bird or mammal in or from this state, by computer-assisted remote hunting.

(b) It is unlawful to establish or operate a computer-assisted remote hunting site for the purpose of taking any bird or mammal from or within this state.

(c) For the purposes of this section, “computer-assisted remote hunting” means the use of a computer or any other remotely controlled device, equipment, software, or technology, to remotely control the aiming or discharge of any weapon, including, but not limited to, any firearm, bow and arrow, spear, harpoon or any other weapon capable of killing or injuring any bird or mammal, for the purposes of taking any bird or mammal.

(d) For the purposes of this section, “computer-assisted remote hunting site” means any computer, internet site or web-based device or system, or other electronically operated site or system used to assist in the remote taking of any bird or mammal.

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14 CCR § 252

Bag and Possession Limit Defined.

Click here.

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14 CCR § 502

Waterfowl, Migratory; American Coot and Common Moorhen (Common Gallinule)

(a) Definitions.

(1) Dark geese.

Dark geese include Canada geese, cackling geese, Aleutian geese and white-fronted geese (“specklebelly”).

(2) Large Canada geese.

Large Canada geese include western Canada geese (“honker”) and lesser Canada geese (“lessers”).

(3) Small Canada geese.

Small (about the size of a mallard) Canada geese include cackling geese and Aleutian geese. Both are white-cheeked geese nearly identical in appearance to Large Canada geese. Aleutian geese have a thin white neck ring and Cackling geese have dark breasts. Both species have a high-pitched cackle as opposed to the deeper “honking”.

(4) White geese.

White geese include Ross’ geese, snow geese and blue phase of both species.

(b) Waterfowl Hunting Zones.

Click here.

(c) Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for American Coots, and Common Moorhens.

Click here.

(d) Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Ducks and Geese by Zone.

Click here.

(e) Youth Waterfowl Hunting Days Regulation

Click here.

(f) Falconry Take of Ducks (including Mergansers), Geese, American Coots, and Common Moorhens.

Click here.

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14 CCR § 505

Decoys.

The use of live birds as decoys is prohibited.

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14 CCR § 506

Shooting Hours.

The shooting hours for migratory game birds, including mourning doves, white-winged doves, band-tailed pigeons, American coots, common moorhens, common snipe (jacksnipe), and waterfowl for all of California shall be from one-half hour before sunrise to sunset.

Exception: In areas open to hunting on, over or adjacent to the waters of Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo County, the shooting time shall be from 7:00 a.m. to sunset.

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14 CCR § 507

Provisions Related to the Taking of Migratory Game Birds.

(a) Authorized Methods.

Only the following methods may be used to take migratory game birds:

(1) Falconry.

(2) Bow and Arrows or Crossbows.

Only arrows or crossbows bolts with flu- flu fletching may be used except that conventionally fletched arrows may be used to take waterfowl sitting on the water from scullboats or similar watercraft. Archers hunting during any archery season may not possess a firearm while in the field engaged in archery hunting.

(3) Muzzle-loading Shotguns.

(4) Shotguns 10 Gauge or Smaller.

Shotguns 10 gauge or smaller using shot shells only and incapable of holding more than three shells in the magazine and chamber combined may be used. except no shotgun larger than 12 gauge shall be used in areas open to hunting on, over or adjacent to the waters of Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo County. If a plug is used to reduce the capacity of a magazine to fulfill the requirements of this section, the plug must be of one piece construction incapable of removal without disassembling the gun. Shotgun shells may not be used or possessed that contain shot size larger than No. BB in lead or T shot in steel or other nontoxic shot approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. All shot shall be loose in the shell.

(b) Use of Dogs.

Dogs may be used to take and retrieve migratory game birds.

(c) Prohibition on Electronically or Mechanically-operated Devices.

Electronic or mechanically-operated calling or sound-reproducing devices are prohibited when attempting to take migratory game birds. It is unlawful to use devices that are either electronically-powered, or activated by anything other than natural wind, to directly or indirectly cause rotation of decoy wings or blades that simulate wings, when attempting to take waterfowl between the start of the waterfowl season and November 30.

(d) Live Decoy Prohibition.

The use of live decoys is prohibited when attempting to take migratory game birds.

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14 CCR § 507.5

Migratory game birds may not be taken by a scull boat or similar watercraft while under motorized power. The motor shall be removed from its mountings before any take or approach is attempted.

This section shall not prohibit shooting migratory game birds from scull boats or similar watercraft with motor attached if beached or anchored; nor shall it prohibit the use of a motor for the sole purpose of picking up dead or injured birds.

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