California Hunting Rivers, Streams, Creeks, Sloughs, Bays

California Hunting Rivers, Streams, Creeks, Sloughs, BaysOn this page, you’ll find a list for California Hunting Rivers, Streams, Creeks, Sloughs, Bays. These waters are “navigable” public ways where hunting may be allowed but ONLY (a) in accordance with general hunting regulations and (b) subject to any Federal, State, or local restrictions, e.g. city/county ordinances (no shoot zones), ecological reserves, marine protected areas, national wildlife refuges, safety zone, wildlife areas.

Warning shot!!!  Extraordinary floodwaters, temporarily flowing  above the normal high-water mark outside any established banks, are NOT navigable (annual floodwaters are navigable). Also see California Hunting Navigable Waters.

List of California Hunting Rivers, Streams, Creeks, Sloughs, Bays

  1. Alameda Creek’s north branch, from its mouth to Eden Landing.
  2. Albion River, to a point three miles from its mouth.
  3. Alviso Slough, sometimes called Steamboat Slough, lying between the bay of San Francisco and the place where it was crossed by the tracks of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company on June 10, 1913.
  4. Arroyo del Medo, in the county of Santa Clara, from its mouth to the upper line of the town of New Haven.
  5. Big River, to a point three miles from its mouth.
  6. Channel Street, in the city of San Francisco, from the bay to the northeasterly line of Seventh Street, the width thereof to be one hundred forty feet.
  7. Clear Lake, in Lake County; but this declaration shall not interfere with any rights of owners and claimants to reclaim swamp or overflowed land around the margin of Clear Lake.
  8. Corte Madera Creek, in Marin County, from its mouth to a point as far as tidewater flows.
  9. Coyote River between the bay of San Francisco and the place where it was crossed by the tracks of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company on June 10, 1913.
  10. Deer Creek, between its mouth and the house of Peter Lassen.
  11. Devil’s Slough, lying within the corporate limits of the city of San Jose, or of the town of Sunnyvale in Santa Clara County, and extending to San Francisco Bay.
  12. Diablo Creek, from its junction with the Neuces, to a point opposite the warehouse of Frank Such, in Contra Costa County.
  13. Eel River streams and sloughs emptying therein.
  14. Feather River, between its mouth and a point fifty feet below the first bridge crossing Feather River above the mouth of the Yuba River.
  15. Galinas, or Guyanas Slough or creek, in Marin County, from its mouth to the line of the Sonoma and Marin Railroad as it existed on March 18, 1907.
  16. Guadalupe Slough, which is the outlet or mouth of the Guadalupe River, and lies between San Francisco Bay and its junction with Alviso Slough.
  17. Humboldt County:
    1. The streams and sloughs south of Eureka, in Humboldt County, which prior to January 2, 1873, were used for the purpose of floating logs or timber.
    2. The sloughs south of Humboldt Point, in Humboldt County, which at high water mark have a depth of two feet of water, and which are wide enough to float and admit a boat carrying five tons or more of freight.
  18. Johnson’s Creek, from its mouth at San Francisco Bay to Simpson’s Landing.
  19. Keys Creek, also known as the Arroyo de San Antonio, in Marin County, from its mouth at Tomales Bay to the warehouses on the point at Keys embarcadero.
  20. Klamath River, from its mouth in Del Norte County to its confluence with the Shasta River in the county of Siskiyou; but this shall not abrogate or infringe upon mining rights or the rights of locating or operating mining claims on the Klamath River, existing on August 21, 1933, otherwise than by being made subject to the public rights of way herein declared.
  21. Mission Creek, in the county of San Francisco.
  22. Mokelumne River, between its mouth and the first falls.
  23. Moro Cojo Slough, in Monterey County, from Salinas River to tidewater.
  24. Napa River, between its mouth and a point sixty feet below the westerly line of Lawrence Street in the city of Napa; First Napa Creek, Second Napa Creek, and Third Napa Creek, in Sonoma County, between Napa and Sonoma rivers.
  25. Neuces Creek, from its mouth at Suisun Bay to a point one-half mile above the warehouse of George P. Loucks.
  26. Newport Bay, in the county of Orange, and all its arms, and the sloughs connecting with the bay in which the tide ebbs and flows, including “The Rialto” and “The Rivo Alto” as shown upon a map of Canal Section, Newport Beach, recorded in Book 4, page 98 of Miscellaneous Maps, records of Orange County, California.
  27. Novato Creek, or estuary, in Marin County, from its mouth to Sweetzer’s Landing.
  28. Noyo River, to a point three miles from its mouth.
  29. Petaluma River, from its mouth to the southerly line of Washington Street, in the city of Petaluma.
  30. California Hunting Rivers, Streams, Creeks, Sloughs, BaysSacramento River, between its mouth and a point 100 feet below Reid’s Ferry, in Shasta County.
  31. Salinas River and Elkhorn Slough, or Estero Viejo, in Monterey County, from its mouth to a point as far up as tidewater flows.
  32. San Francisco Bay Area: That part of a slough which lies between Simonds Canal in the town of Alviso and the bay of San Francisco.
  33. San Joaquin River, between its mouth and Sycamore Point.
  34. San Leandro Bay, in the County of Alameda, the waters included in the estuary of San Antonio and the tidal canal connecting it with San Leandro; and the airport channel extending from the bay.
  35. San Rafael Creek, in Marin County, from its mouth to a point as far as tidewater flows therein.
  36. Sonoma River, between its mouth and a point opposite Fowler’s hotel in the town of San Luis.
  37. Stockton Slough, between its mouth and a line 160 feet west of the east line of Center Street extended in Stockton.
  38. Suisun River, between its mouth and the Town of Suisun embarcadero.
  39. Tideland: That certain creek running through the tideland survey numbered 68, and swamp and overflowed land survey numbered 145, from its mouth to the head of the tidewater therein.
  40. Tuolumne River, between its mouth and Dickinson’s Ferry.
  41. Yuba River, between its mouth and a point at the mouth of the slough at the foot of F Street, in the City of Marysville.

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