35 California Furbearing Mammal Regulations for Badger, Beaver, Gray Fox, Mink, Muskrat, and Raccoon

California furbearing mammal regulations for California gray fox hunting seasons, and California gray fox trapping.

Here, we fetch up California furbearing mammal regulations for hunting. We also retrieve them for trapping and killing furbearing mammals. Those mammals include badger, beaver, gray fox, mink, muskrat, and raccoon.

Regulations

California furbearing mammal regulations
California furbearing mammal regulations.
  1. FGC § 2005 (a) generally prohibits lights when hunting game birds and game mammals; (b) prohibits lights (i) on a highway, woodland, or forest where mammals are commonly found or (ii) upon mammals while in possession of a weapon (e.g. firearm) that could be used to kill it; (c) prohibits “night vision equipment” to help take any bird or mammal; (d) exempts (i) landowners with permits to take mammals causing damage to people or property per Section 4180, (ii) certain hand-held flashlight unless attached to a weapon, (iii) certain lamps and lanterns, (iv) normal use of motor vehicle headlights, (v) agricultural landowners and employees; and (e) prohibits arrest by anyone besides a peace officer.
  2. FGC § 2250. Permit to import, transport, or possess live muskrat
  3. FGC § 3003.1. Body-gripping taps and illegal sale of raw fur
  4. FGC § 3031. Hunting license for adults, juniors, nonresidents
  5. FGC § 3039. Buying and selling birds, mammals, including furbearing and nongame mammals
  6. FGC § 4000. Furbearing mammals
  7. FGC § 4002. Hunting methods
  8. FGC § 4003. Poison permits
  9. FGC § 4004. Illegal traps, trap tags, trap checking, dispatch, conibear traps, warning signs, drawing, injection, and crushing except beaver and muskrat
  10. FGC § 4005. Trapping license, test
  11. FGC § 4006. Trapping license age, fees, residency
  12. FGC § 4007. Trapping license year, selling fur
  13. FGC § 4008. Trapping license renewal, declaration
  14. FGC § 4009. Disturbing traps of others
  15. FGC § 4030. Dealer license [also see Sec. 4034]
  16. FGC § 4152. Muskrats and red fox causing property damage
  17. FGC § 4180. Furbearers causing property damage [also see FGC § 4181]
  18. FGC § 4181.  Permits for animals causing property damage (bear, beaver, elk, pig, squirrels, turkey)
  19. 14 CCR § 251.5. Possession, kill, daily bag limit
  20. 14 CCR § 263 prohibits night hunting in Monterey County and San Benito County east of Highway 101.
  21. 14 CCR § 264 allows lights of any size or voltage for hunting furbearing mammals and nongame mammals in Zone 1 and Zone 2 (as described) except (a) during the general deer season, (b) in a moving vehicle, (c) in a vehicle with the motor running, (d) from a vehicle on a public road or highway.
  22. 14 CCR § 264.5 generally allows lights for hunting furbearing mammals and nongame mammals outside of Zone 1 and Zone 2, as described in Section 264, but only if the light is (a) powered only with a 9-volt battery or smaller, (b) held in the hand or worn on the head, and (c) being used while on foot; and exempts landowners preventing property damage, e.g. livestock, by furbearing and nongame.
  23. 14 CCR § 265. Dogs for hunting and training on mammals.
  24. 14 CCR § 401. Permits for animals causing property damage (bear, beaver, bobcat, deer, elk, pigs, squirrels, turkey)
  25. 14 CCR § 460. Protected species (Fisher, marten, river otter, desert kit fox and red fox)
  26. 14 CCR § 461. Seasons, limits, badger, gray fox, and dogs.
  27. 14 CCR § 462. Seasons, limits, muskrat, mink.
  28. 14 CCR § 463. Beaver seasons, bag limits, hunting areas
  29. 14 CCR § 464. Raccoon, seasons, bag limits, hunting areas, and dogs.
  30. 14 CCR § 465. Hunting methods and contests
  31. 14 CCR § 465.5. Types of traps allowed and prohibited
  32. 14 CCR § 466. Shooting / Trapping hours
  33. 14 CCR § 467. Trapping reports, suspension
  34. 14 CCR § 474. Night hunting areas and restrictions
  35. 14 CCR § 656. Permits to take beaver or bear in a refuge
  36. 14 CCR § 700. Possession of hunting license

FGC § 2250 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

It is unlawful to import or transport any live muskrat (genus Ondatra) into, or possess any live muskrat in, California except under permit issued by the department pursuant to Section 2118, or as otherwise provided by law. A county agricultural commissioner, fish and game deputy, or state plant quarantine officer may enter upon lands or waters west of the crest of the Cascade-Sierra Nevada mountain system, and west and south of the Tehachapi, Liebre, San Gabriel, San Bernardino, San Jacinto, Cuyamaca, and connected mountains south to the international boundary, or in any watershed tributary to, or draining into, the Pacific Ocean to remove or destroy the muskrats.


FGC § 3003.1 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Notwithstanding Sections 1001, 1002, 4002, 4004, 4007, 4008, 4009.5, 4030, 4034, 4042, 4152, 4180, or 4181:

(a) It is unlawful for any person to trap for the purposes of recreation or commerce in fur any fur-bearing mammal or nongame mammal with any body-gripping trap. A body-gripping trap is one that grips the mammal’s body or body part, including, but not limited to, steel-jawed leghold traps, padded-jaw leghold traps, conibear traps, and snares. Cage and box traps, nets, suitcase-type live beaver traps, and common rat and mouse traps shall not be considered body-gripping traps.

(b) It is unlawful for any person to buy, sell, barter, or otherwise exchange for profit, or to offer to buy, sell, barter, or otherwise exchange for profit, the raw fur, as defined by Section 4005, of any fur-bearing mammal or nongame mammal that was trapped in this state, with a body-gripping trap as described in subdivision (a).

(c) It is unlawful for any person, including an employee of the federal, state, county, or municipal government, to use or authorize the use of any steel-jawed leghold trap, padded or otherwise, to capture any game mammal, fur-bearing mammal, nongame mammal, protected mammal, or any dog or cat. The prohibition in this subdivision does not apply to federal, state, county, or municipal government employees or their duly authorized agents in the extraordinary case where the otherwise prohibited padded-jaw leghold trap is the only method available to protect human health or safety.

(d) For purposes of this section, fur-bearing mammals, game mammals, nongame mammals, and protected mammals are those mammals so defined by statute on January 1, 1997.


FGC § 3031 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Hunting Licenses

(a) A hunting license, granting the privilege to take birds and mammals, shall be issued to any of the following:

(1) A resident of this state, 18 years of age or older, upon the payment of a base fee of thirty-one dollars and twenty-five cents ($31.25).

(2) A resident or nonresident, who is under 18 years of age on July 1 of the licensing year, upon the payment of a base fee of eight dollars and twenty-five cents ($8.25), regardless of whether that person applies before or after July 1 of that year. A license issued pursuant to this paragraph shall be known as a junior hunting license.

(3) A nonresident, 18 years of age or older, upon the payment of a base fee of one hundred eight dollars and fifty cents ($108.50).

(4) A nonresident, 18 years of age or older, valid only for two consecutive days upon payment of the fee set forth in paragraph (1). A license issued pursuant to this paragraph is valid only for taking resident and migratory game birds, resident small game mammals, fur-bearing mammals, and nongame mammals, as defined in this code or in regulations adopted by the commission.

(5) A nonresident, valid for one day and only for the taking of domesticated game birds and pheasants while on the premises of a licensed game bird club, or for the taking of domesticated migratory game birds in areas licensed for shooting those birds, upon the payment of a base fee of fifteen dollars ($15).

(b) The base fees specified in this section are applicable to the 2004 license year, and shall be adjusted annually thereafter pursuant to Section 713.

(c) The commission shall adjust the amount of the fees specified in subdivision (b), as necessary, to fully recover, but not exceed, all reasonable administrative and implementation costs of the department and the commission relating to those licenses.

(d) A person who is 16 or 17 years of age, is in possession of a valid junior hunting license, and is issued an entry permit pursuant to Section 551 of Title 14 of the California Code of Regulations may hunt in the area described in the entry permit unaccompanied by a person over 18 years of age but shall not be accompanied by a person under 16 years of age.

(e) This section shall remain in effect only until July 1, 2020, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2021, deletes or extends that date.


FGC § 3039 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

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FGC § 4000 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

The following are fur-bearing mammals: pine marten, fisher, mink, river otter, gray fox, red fox, kit fox, raccoon, beaver, badger, and muskrat. 


FGC § 4002 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Fur-bearing mammals may be taken only with a trap, a firearm, bow and arrow, poison under a proper permit, or with the use of dogs.


FGC § 4003 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

It is unlawful to use poison to take fur-bearing mammals without a permit from the department. The department may issue such a permit upon a written application indicating the kind of poison desired to be used and the time and place of use.


FGC § 4004 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

It is unlawful to do any of the following:

(a) Use a steel-jawed leghold trap, or use any trap with saw-toothed or spiked jaws.

(b) Use a body-gripping trap, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 3003.1, for the purpose of recreation or commerce in fur.

(c) Set or maintain traps that do not bear a number or other identifying mark registered to the department or, in the case of a federal, state, county, or city agency, bear the name of that agency, except that traps set pursuant to Section 4152 or 4180 shall bear an identifying mark in a manner specified by the department. No registration fee shall be charged pursuant to this subdivision.

(d) Fail to visit and remove all animals from traps at least once daily. If the trapping is done pursuant to Section 4152 or 4180, the inspection and removal shall be done by the person who sets the trap or the owner of the land where the trap is set or an agent of either.

(e) Use a conibear trap that is larger than 6 inches by 6 inches, unless partially or wholly submerged in water. Unless prohibited by the department as a permit condition, a lawfully set conibear trap that is 10 inches by 10 inches or less may be set pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 465.5 of Title 14 of the California Code of Regulations.

(f) When any conibear trap is set on publicly owned land or land expressly open to public use, fail to post signs at every entrance and exit to the property indicating the presence of conibear traps and at least four additional signs posted within a radius of 50 feet of the trap, one in each cardinal direction, with lettering that is a minimum of three inches high stating: “Danger! Traps Set For Wildlife. Keep Out.” Signs shall be maintained and checked daily.

(g) Kill any trapped mammal in accordance with this section by intentional drowning, injection with any chemical not sold for the purpose of euthanizing animals, or thoracic compression, commonly known as chest crushing. This subdivision shall not be construed to prohibit the use of lawfully set conibear traps set partially or wholly submerged in water for beaver or muskrat or the use of lawfully set colony traps set in water for muskrat.


FGC § 4005 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, every person, other than a fur dealer, who traps fur-bearing mammals or nongame mammals, designated by the commission or who sells raw furs of those mammals, shall procure a trapping license. “Raw fur” means any fur, pelt, or skin that has not been tanned or cured, except that salt-cured or sun-cured pelts are raw furs.

(b) The department shall develop standards that are necessary to ensure the competence and proficiency of applicants for a trapping license. No person shall be issued a license until he or she has passed a test of his or her knowledge and skill in this field.

(c) Persons trapping mammals in accordance with Section 4152 or 4180 are not required to procure a trapping license except when providing trapping services for profit.

(d) No raw furs taken by persons providing trapping services for profit may be sold.

(e) The license requirement imposed by this section does not apply to any of the following:

(1) Officers or employees of federal, county, or city agencies or the department, when acting in their official capacities, or officers or employees of the Department of Food and Agriculture when acting pursuant to the Food and Agricultural Code pertaining to pests or pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 6021) of Chapter 9 of Part 1 of Division 4 of the Food and Agricultural Code.

(2) Structural pest control operators licensed pursuant to Chapter 14 (commencing with Section 8500) of Division 3 of the Business and Professions Code, when trapping rats, mice, voles, moles, or gophers.

(3) Persons and businesses licensed or certified by the Department of Pesticide Regulation pursuant to Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 11701) and Chapter 8 (commencing with Section 12201) of Division 6 of, and Chapter 3.6, (commencing with Section 14151) of Division 7 of, the Food and Agricultural Code, when trapping rats, mice, voles, moles, or gophers.

(f) Except for species that are listed pursuant to Chapter 1.5 (commencing with Section 2050) of Division 3 or Chapter 8 (commencing with Section 4700), nothing in this code or regulations adopted pursuant thereto shall prevent or prohibit a person from trapping any of the following animals:

(1) Gophers.

(2) House mice.

(3) Moles.

(4) Rats.

(5) Voles.


FGC § 4006 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

(a) A trapping license shall be issued as follows:

(1) To any resident of this state over the age of 16 years upon payment of a base fee of forty-five dollars ($45), as adjusted under Section 713.

(2) To any resident of this state under the age of 16 years upon payment of a base fee of fifteen dollars ($15), as adjusted under Section 713.

(3) To any person not a resident of this state upon payment of a base fee of two hundred twenty-five dollars ($225), as adjusted under Section 713.

(b) A license shall not be issued to a nonresident if the state in which he or she resides does not provide for issuance of a nonresident trapping license to California residents. Also, a nonresident issued a license under this subdivision may take only those species, and may take or possess only that quantity of a species that a resident of California may take or possess under a nonresident trapping license or permit in the state of residence of that nonresident.

(c) The commission shall adjust the amount of the fees specified in subdivision (a), as necessary, to fully recover, but not exceed, all reasonable administrative and implementation costs of the department and the commission relating to those licenses.


FGC § 4007 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

A trapping license authorizes the person to whom it is issued to take, during the open season, fur-bearing mammals and nongame mammals for a term of one year from July 1st, or if issued after the beginning of such term, for the remainder thereof and to sell the raw fur of any such animal.


FGC § 4008 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

No trapping license shall be issued to any applicant within one year following the expiration of any trapping license previously issued to such applicant unless he has submitted to the department a sworn statement showing the number of each kind of fur-bearing mammals and nongame mammals taken under the previous license and the names and addresses of the persons to whom they were shipped or sold.


 FGC § 4009 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

It is unlawful to remove or disturb the trap of any licensee while the trap is being used by the licensee on public land or on land where the licensee has permission to trap. This section does not apply to any employee of the department while engaged in the performance of official duties.


FGC § 4030 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Every person engaging in, carrying on, or conducting wholly or in part the business of buying, selling, trading or dealing in raw furs of fur-bearing mammals or nongame mammals is a fur dealer and shall procure a fur dealer license. No fur dealer license shall be required of a licensed trapper selling raw furs which he has lawfully taken, or a domesticated game breeder selling raw furs of animals which he has raised.


FGC § 4152 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

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FGC § 4180 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

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FGC § 4181 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

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14 CCR § 251.5 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

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(c) Every game bird, game mammal, furbearer or nongame animal taken under the authority of a hunting or trapping license and reduced to possession by the hunter or trapper shall be immediately killed and become a part of the daily bag limit.


14 CCR § 401 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

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14 CCR § 460 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Fisher, Marten, River Otter, Desert Kit Fox and Red Fox.

Fisher, marten, river otter, desert kit fox and red fox may not be taken at any time.


14 CCR § 461 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Badger and Gray Fox.

(a) Badger may be taken as follows:

(1) Season and Area: November 16 through the last day of February, statewide.

(2) Bag and Possession Limit: No limit.

(b) Gray fox may be taken as follows:

(1) Season and Area: November 24 through the last day of February, statewide.

(2) Bag and Possession Limit: No limit.

(3) Dogs may be permitted to pursue gray fox in the course of breaking, training, or practicing dogs in accordance with the provisions of Section 265 of these regulations.


14 CCR § 462 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Muskrat and Mink.

Except as noted in Section 4180, Fish and Game Code, muskrat and mink may be taken only as follows:

Season and Area:

November 16 through March 31, statewide. (This regulation supersedes Section 4001 of the Fish and Game Code.)

Bag and Possession Limit:

No limit.


14 CCR § 463 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Beaver.

Beaver may be taken only as follows:

(a) Season and Area: November 1 through March 31 in the counties of Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, Contra Costa, Del Norte, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Humboldt, Imperial, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Lake, Lassen, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Modoc, Mono, Monterey, Nevada (except Sagehen Creek), Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Tulare, Tuolumne, Yolo and Yuba; and those portions of Riverside and San Bernardino counties within 10 miles of the Arizona-California border. (This regulation supersedes Section 4001 of the Fish and Game Code.)

Bag and Possession Limit: There is no bag or possession limit in these areas for the taking of beaver.

(b) Beaver or any part thereof may not be taken in the balance of the state including the counties of Los Angeles, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Orange, San Benito, San Diego, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, and Ventura; and those portions of Riverside and San Bernardino counties further than 10 miles from the California-Arizona border. (This regulation supersedes Section 4001 of the Fish and Game Code.)


14 CCR § 464 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Raccoon.

(a) Seasons and Areas:

(1) Raccoon may be taken from July 1 through March 31 in the following area: All of Imperial County and those portions of Riverside and San Bernardino counties lying south and east of the following line: Beginning at the intersection of Highway 86 with the north boundary of Imperial County; north along Highway 86 to the intersection with Interstate 10; east along Interstate 10 to its intersection with the Cottonwood Springs Road in Section 9, T6S, R11E, S.B.B.M.; north along the Cottonwood Springs Road and the Mecca Dale Road to Amboy; east along Highway 66 to the intersection with Highway 95; north along Highway 95 to the California-Nevada state line.

(2) November 16 through March 31 in the balance of the state.

(b) Bag and Possession Limit:

No limit.

(c) Method of Take:

(1) When taking raccoon after dark, pistols and rifles not larger than .22 caliber rimfire and shotguns using shot no larger than No. BB are the only firearms which may be used during this night period. (This regulation supersedes Sections 4001 and 4002 of the Fish and Game Code.) (See Sections 264 and 264.5 for light regulations.)

(2) The take or attempted take of any raccoon with a firearm shall be in accordance with the use of nonlead projectiles and ammunition pursuant to Section 250.1.

(d) Dogs may be permitted to pursue raccoons in the course of breaking, training or practicing dogs in accordance with the provisions of Section 265 of these regulations.


14 CCR § 465 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

General Provisions for Taking Furbearers.

(a) Furbearing mammals may be taken only with a firearm, bow and arrow, or with the use of dogs, or traps in accordance with the provisions of Section 465.5 of these regulations and Section 3003.1 of the Fish and Game Code. The take or attempted take of any furbearing mammal with a firearm shall be in accordance with the use of nonlead projectiles and ammunition pursuant to Section 250.1.

(b) Pursuant to Fish and Game Code Section 2003, it is unlawful to offer any prize or other inducement as a reward for the taking of furbearers in an individual contest, tournament, or derby.


 14 CCR § 465.5 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Use of Traps. (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

(a) Traps Defined.

Traps are defined to include padded-jaw leg-hold, steel-jawed leg-hold, and conibear traps, snares, dead-falls, cage traps and other devices designed to confine, hold, grasp, grip, clamp or crush animals’ bodies or body parts.

(b) Affected Mammals Defined.

For purposes of this section, furbearing mammals, game mammals, nongame mammals, and protected mammals are those mammals so defined by statute on January 1, 1997, in sections 3950, 4000, 4150 and 4700 of the Fish and Game Code.

(c) Prohibition on Trapping for the Purposes of Recreation or Commerce in Fur.

It is unlawful for any person to trap for the purposes of recreation or commerce in fur any furbearing mammal or nongame mammal with any body-gripping trap. A body-gripping trap is one that grips the mammal’s body or body part, including, but not limited to, steel-jawed leg-hold traps, padded-jaw leg-hold traps, conibear traps, and snares. Cage and box traps, nets, suitcase-type live beaver traps, and common rat and mouse traps shall not be considered body-gripping traps and may be used to trap for the purposes of recreation or commerce in fur any furbearing or nongame mammal.

(d) Prohibition on Exchange of Raw Fur.

It is unlawful for any person to buy, sell, barter, or otherwise exchange for profit, or to offer to buy, sell, barter, or otherwise exchange for profit, the raw fur, as defined by Section 4005 of the Fish and Game Code, of any furbearing mammal or nongame mammal that was trapped in this state, with a body-gripping trap as described in subsection (c) above.

(e) Prohibition on Use of Steel-jawed Leg-hold Traps by Individuals.

It is unlawful for any person to use or authorize the use of any steel-jawed leg-hold trap, padded or otherwise, to capture any game mammal, furbearing mammal, nongame mammal, protected mammal, or any dog or cat.

(1) Exception for Extraordinary Case to Protect Human Health or Safety. The prohibition in subsection (e) does not apply to federal, state, county, or municipal government employees or their duly authorized agents in the extraordinary case where the otherwise prohibited padded-jaw leg-hold trap is the only method available to protect human health or safety.

(A) Leg-hold Trap Requirements. Leg-hold traps used to implement subsection (e)(1) must be padded, commercially manufactured, and equipped as provided in subsections (A)1. through (A)5. below.

1. Anchor Chains. Anchor chains must be attached to the center of the padded trap, rather than the side.

2. Chain Swivels. Anchor chains must have a double swivel mechanism attached as follows: One swivel is required where the chain attaches to the center of the trap. The second swivel may be located at any point along the chain, but it must be functional at all times.

3. Shock Absorbing Device. A shock absorbing device such as a spring must be in the anchor chain.

4. Tension Device. Padded leg-hold traps must be equipped with a commercially manufactured pan tension adjusting device.

5. Trap Pads. Trap pads must be replaced with new pads when worn and maintained in good condition.

(f) Use of Non-Body-Gripping Traps for Purposes of Recreation or Commerce in Fur.

Any person who utilizes non-body-gripping traps for the take of furbearing mammals and nongame mammals for purposes of recreation or commerce in fur must comply with the provisions of subsections (g)(1) through (3) below.

(1) Trap Number Requirement. Any person who traps furbearing mammals or nongame mammals shall obtain a trap number issued by and registered with the department. All traps, before being put into use, shall bear only the current registered trap number or numbers of the person using, or in possession of those traps. This number shall be stamped clearly on the trap or on a metal tag attached to the chain of the trap or to any part of the trap.

(g) Use of Conibear Traps, Snares, Cage and Box Traps, Nets, Suitcase-type Live Beaver Traps and Common Rat and Mouse Traps for Purposes Unrelated to Recreation or Commerce in Fur.

Conibear traps, snares, cage and box traps, nets, suitcase-type live beaver traps and common rat and mouse traps may be used by individuals to take authorized mammals for purposes unrelated to recreation or commerce in fur, including, but not limited to, the protection of property, in accordance with subsections (1) through (5) below. Except for common rat and mouse traps, all traps used pursuant to this subsection must be numbered as required by subsection (f)(1) above. The prohibitions of subsections (c) and (d) above shall apply to any furbearing or nongame mammal taken by a conibear trap or snare pursuant to this subsection (g).

(1) Immediate Dispatch or Release. All furbearing and nongame mammals that are legal to trap must be immediately killed or released. Unless released, trapped animals shall be killed by shooting where local ordinances, landowners, and safety permit. This regulation does not prohibit employees of federal, state, or local government from using chemical euthanasia to dispatch trapped animals.

(2) Trap Visitation Requirement. All traps shall be visited at least once daily by the owner of the traps or his/her designee. Such designee shall carry on his/her person written authorization, as owner’s representative, to check traps. In the event that an unforeseen medical emergency prevents the owner of the traps from visiting traps another person may, with written authorization from the owner, check traps as required. The designee and the person who issues the authorization to check traps shall comply with all provisions of Section 465.5. Each time traps are checked all trapped animals shall be removed.

(3) Trap Placement Requirement. Traps may not be set within 150 yards of any structure used as a permanent or temporary residence, unless such traps are set by a person controlling such property or by a person who has and is carrying with him written consent of the landowner to so place the trap or traps.

(4) Placement of Conibear Traps. Traps of the conibear-type with a jaw opening larger than 8” x 8” may be used only in sets where the trap is wholly or partially submerged in water or is:

(A) Within 100 feet of permanent water.

(B) Within 100 feet of seasonally flooded marshes, pastures, agricultural lands or floodways when standing or running water is present.

(C) Within the riparian vegetation zone, characterized by, but not limited to, willow, cottonwood, sycamore, salt cedar, cattail, bulrush and rushes, when found within the area defined in section 463(a) where the take of beaver is permitted.

(5) Zones Prohibited to the Use of Conibear-type Traps and Snares. Conibear-type traps and snares, except those totally submerged, and deadfall traps are prohibited in the following zones.

(A) Zone 1: Beginning at Interstate 5 and Highway 89, east on Highway 89 to Harris Springs Road near Bartle, north on Harris Springs Road (primary U.S. Forest Service Road 15) to Powder Hill Road (primary U.S. Forest Service Road 49), northeast on Powder Hill Road to Road 42N56, east on Road 42N56 to the Siskiyou/Modoc county line, north on the Siskiyou/Modoc county line to the boundary of the Lava Beds National Monument, north along the eastern boundary of the Lava Beds National Monument, then west then south along the western boundary of the Lava Beds National Monument to Road 46N21, west along Road 46N21 over Gold Digger Pass to the western boundary of the Modoc National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Modoc National Forest to the boundary of the Shasta National Forest, west along the northern boundary of the Shasta National Forest to Highway 97, southwest on Highway 97 to Interstate 5, northwest on Interstate 5 to Old Highway 99, northwest on Old Highway 99 to Stewart Springs Road, southwest on Stewart Springs Road to the Yreka Ditch, west along the Yreka Ditch to the Gazelle/Callahan Road, southwest on the Gazelle/Callahan Road to Highway 3, south on Highway 3 to Ramshorn Road, northeast on Ramshorn Road to Castle Creek Road, east on Castle Creek Road to Interstate 5, north on Interstate 5 to the point of beginning.

(B) Zone 2: Beginning in Tehama County at the intersection of Highway 36 and the western boundary of the Lassen National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Lassen National Forest to the boundary of the Plumas National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Plumas National Forest to the boundary of the Tahoe National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Tahoe National Forest to the boundary of the El Dorado National Forest, south along the western boundary of the El Dorado National Forest to the boundary of the Stanislaus National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Stanislaus National Forest to the boundary of the Sierra National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Sierra National Forest to the boundary of the Sequoia National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Sequoia National Forest to Highway 245, southwest on Highway 245 to Road 168, southwest on Road 168 to County Road J40, west on County Road J40 to Henderson Road, northwest on Henderson Road to Lincoln Avenue, west on Lincoln Avenue to Highway 145, north on Highway 145 to Avenue 7, west on Avenue 7 to Road 21, north on Road 21 to Avenue 12, west on Avenue 12 to Road 16, north on Road 16 to Avenue 18 1/2, west on Avenue 18 1/2 to Road 9, north on Road 9 to Highway 152, west on Highway 152 to Highway 59, north on Highway 59 to Highway 99, northwest on Highway 99 to Highway 140, west on Highway 140 to Highway 33, north on Highway 33 to Interstate 5, north on Interstate 5 to County Road J4, west on County Road J4 to County Road J2, north on County Road J2 to Highway 4, west on Highway 4 to Lone Tree Way, west on Lone Tree Way to James Donlon Boulevard, west on James Donlon Boulevard to Somersville Road, south on Somersville Road to Nortonville Road, north on Nortonville Road to Kirker Pass Road, southwest on Kirker Pass Road to Clayton Road, southeast on Clayton Road to Mitchell Canyon Road, south on Mitchell Canyon Road to the boundary of Mount Diablo State Park, south along the western boundary of Mount Diablo State Park to Mt. Diablo Scenic Boulevard, south on Mt. Diablo Scenic Boulevard to Blackhawk Road, southeast on Blackhawk Road to Camino Tassajara, west on Camino Tassajara to Dougherty Road, south on Dougherty Road to Interstate 580, west on Interstate 580 to Interstate 680, south on Interstate 680 to Highway 84, northeast on Highway 84 to Holmes Street, south on Holmes Street to Wetmore Road, east on Wetmore Road to Arroyo Road, south on Arroyo Road to Del Valle Regional Park, southeast along the western boundary of Del Valle Regional Park to Arroyo Del Valle Creek, southeast on Arroyo Del Valle Creek to the Alameda/Santa Clara county line, east on the Alameda/Santa Clara county line to San Antonio Valley Road, south on San Antonio Valley Road to Del Puerto Canyon Road, east on Del Puerto Canyon Road to Santa Clara/Stanislaus county line, south along the Santa Clara/Stanislaus county line to the Santa Clara/Merced county line, south along the Santa Clara/Merced county line to the San Benito/Merced county line, south along the San Benito/Merced county line to Little Panoche Road, south on Little Panoche Road to Panoche Road, east on Panoche Road to New Idria Road, south along New Idria Road to Clear Creek Road, southwest on Clear Creek Road to Coalinga Road, southeast on Coalinga Road to Coalinga-Mineral Springs Road, south on Coalinga-Minerial Springs Road to Highway 198, east on Highway 198 to Parkfield Grade, south on Parkfield Grade to Vineyard Canyon Road, west on Vineyard Canyon Road to Highway 101, north on Highway 101 to Bradley Road, north on Bradley Road to Sargents Road, north on Sargents Road to Pancho Rico Road, west on Pancho Rico Road to Cattleman’s Road, north on Cattleman’s Road to Highway 198, west on Highway 198 to Highway 101, north on Highway 101 to County Road G13, northeast on County Road G13 to Highway 25, north on Highway 25 to Browns Valley Road, north on Browns Valley Road to Santa Anita Road, northwest on Santa Anita Road to Santa Ana Valley Road, north on Santa Ana Valley Road to Fairview Road, north on Fairview Road to Highway 156, north on Highway 156 to Highway 152, southwest on Highway 152 to County Road G7, southwest on County Road G7 to Highway 25, west on Highway 25 to Highway 101, south on Highway 101 to the San Benito/Monterey county line, south on the San Benito/Monterey county line to Highway 146, west on Highway 146 to Highway 101, south on Highway 101 to Paraiso Springs Road, south on Paraiso Springs Road to County Road G17, south on County Road G17 to County Road 16, northeast on County Road 16 to Central Avenue, southeast on Central Avenue to Highway 101, south on Highway 101 to County Road G14, south on County Road G14 to Milpitas Road, west on Milpitas Road to the boundary of Fort Hunter Liggett, south along the western boundary of Fort Hunter Liggett to the Nacimiento River, southeast along the Nacimiento River to Nacimiento Reservoir, southeast along the western boundary of Nacimiento Reservoir to Chimney Rock Road, south on Chimney Rock Road to Klau Mine Road, south on Klau Mine Road to Adelaida Road, east on Adelaida Road to Vineyard Drive, southeast on Vineyard Drive to Highway 101, south on Highway 101 to Highway 41, east on Highway 41 to Highway 229, south on Highway 229 to Creston O’Donovan Road, southeast on Creston O’Donovan Road to Highway 58, east on Highway 58 to the boundary of the Los Padres National Forest, south and east along the eastern boundary of the Los Padres National Forest to Highway 33, south on Highway 33 to Quatal Canyon Road, east on Quatal Canyon Road to Cerro Noroeste Road, east on Cerro Noroeste Road to Cuddy Valley Road, east on Cuddy Valley Road to Interstate 5, north on Interstate 5 to Wheeler Ridge Road, east on Wheeler Ridge Road to Laval Road, east on Laval Road to Rancho Road, north on Rancho Road to Sycamore Road, east on Sycamore Road to Tejon Highway, north on Tejon Highway to Highway 223, northeast on Highway 223 to Highway 58, east on Highway 58 to Caliente Bodfish Road, north on Caliente Bodfish Road to Highway 155, northeast then west on Highway 155 to the eastern boundary of the Sequoia National Forest, north and east along the southern boundary of the Sequoia National Forest to the Dome Land Wilderness, north along the eastern boundary of the Dome Land Wilderness to the boundary of the Inyo National Forest, north along the eastern boundary of the Inyo National Forest west of Highway 395 to the intersection of Inyo National Forest and Highway 395 near Sherwin Summit in Mono County, north on Highway 395 to the California/Nevada state line, north on the California/Nevada state line to Highway 395 in Sierra County, north on Highway 395 to Long Valley Road, south on Long Valley Road to the boundary of the Toiyabe National Forest, west along the Toiyabe National Forest boundary to the Tahoe National Forest boundary, west then south then west then north along the Tahoe National Forest boundary to the Plumas National Forest boundary, north then east then north along the eastern boundary of the Plumas National Forest to the Lassen National Forest boundary, north along the eastern boundary of the Lassen National Forest to the northern boundary of the Lassen National Forest, west along the northern boundary of the Lassen National Forest to the western boundary of the Lassen National Forest, south along the western boundary of the Lassen National Forest to the point of beginning.

(h) Statutory Penalty for Violation of Provisions. Violation of Section 3003.1 or 3003.2 of the Fish and Game Code, or any rule or regulation, including this Section 465.5, adopted pursuant thereto, is punishable by a fine of not less than three hundred dollars ($300) or more than two thousand dollars ($2,000), or by imprisonment in the county jail for not more than one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment.


14 CCR § 466 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Hours for Taking Furbearers.

Furbearers may be hunted at any hour of the day or night except that they may not be taken between one-half hour after sunset and one-half hour before sunrise in the area described in Section 474(a) of these regulations.


14 CCR § 467 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Trapping Reports.

All holders of trapping licenses must submit to the department a sworn statement or report by July 1 of his/her annual take of fur for the preceding trapping season. Statement or report shall show the number of each kind of furbearing mammals and nongame mammals taken, number sold, county in which furs were taken and the names and addresses of the persons to whom furs were shipped or sold. If the annual report is not received by July 1 following the most recent trapping year, or if it is not completely filled out, the trapper’s license will be suspended. The commission shall be notified of any suspension and, subsequently, may revoke or reinstate applicant’s license renewal application after written notice is given to the applicant and after he has been afforded an opportunity to be heard.


14 CCR § 474 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Hours for Taking.

Nongame mammals may be taken at any time except as provided in this section.

(a) Area Closed to Night Hunting. Nongame mammals may be taken only between one-half hour before sunrise and one-half hour after sunset in the following described area: Beginning at a point where Little Panoche Road crosses Interstate 5 near Mendota; south on Interstate 5 to Highway 198; east on Highway 198 to Highway 99; south on Highway 99 to Interstate 5; south on Interstate 5 to the Los Padres National Forest boundary in Section 8, T 9 N, R 19 W, S.B.B.M near Fort Tejon Historical Monument; west along the National Forest boundary to Cerro Noroeste Road; northwest on Cerro Noroeste Road to Highway 33-166; north on Highway 33-166 to the Soda Lake Road; northwest on the Soda Lake Road and on the Simmler Soda Lake San Diego Creek Road to Highway 58 at Simmler; west on Highway 58 to the Cammotti Shandon Road; north on the Cammotti Shandon Road to the Shandon San Juan Road; north on the Shandon San Juan Road to Highway 41; northeast on Highway 41 to the Cholame Valley Road; northwest on Cholame Valley Road and Cholame Road to the Parkfield Coalinga Road in Parkfield; north on Parkfield Coalinga Road and Parkfield Grade to Highway 198; northwest on Highway 198 to the Fresno-Monterey county line; north along the Fresno-Monterey county and Fresno-San Benito county lines to the Little Panoche Road; north and east on the Little Panoche Road to the point of beginning at Interstate 5.

This section does not pertain to the legal take of nongame mammals with traps as provided for by Sections 461-480 of these regulations, and by Sections 4000-4012, 4152 and 4180 of the Fish and Game Code. (This regulation supersedes Section 3000 of the Fish and Game Code.)

(b) On privately-owned property, not included in (a) above, nongame mammals may be taken from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise only by the landowner or his agents, or by persons who have in their immediate possession written permission issued by the landowner or tenant that states the permittee can trespass from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise on property under the ownership or control of such landowners or tenants.

(c) Fallow deer, axis deer, sambar deer, sika deer, aoudad, mouflon, tahr and feral goats may be taken only from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset.


14 CCR § 656 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Permits to Take Beaver or Bear in a Refuge. The department may issue a free permit to take beaver or bear within a refuge under the following conditions:

(a) Applications to take beaver or bear shall be filed with the department and shall show

(1) Name and address of applicant.

(2) Name of refuge involved.

(3) The approximate number of animals to be taken.

(4) Such other pertinent data as the department may require.

(b) All permits shall be for a stated period of time not to exceed six months.

(c) No permit shall be issued unless the department is satisfied that damage is presently occurring or is immediately threatened.

(d) During the first two weeks of January of each year, each permittee shall submit to the department report of specimens taken during the preceding calendar year and no new permit shall be issued until such a report has been received.

(e) The commission may revoke a permit for violation of the terms of the permit.

(f) Any applicant convicted of violating these regulations or the terms and conditions of his permit must appear before the Fish and Game Commission before his permit may be reinstated or a new permit issued to him.


14 CCR § 700 (California Furbearing Mammal Regulations)

Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Possession.

(a) Possession of Sport Fishing License: Every person, while engaged in taking any fish, amphibian or reptile, shall have on their person or in their immediate possession a valid sport fishing license, except when diving as provided in Section 7145 of the Fish and Game Code.

(b) Possession of Hunting License: Every person, while engaged in taking any bird or mammal shall have on their person or in their immediate possession a valid hunting license.


While we try to fetch up all California furbearing mammal regulations, we might miss a few or make a typo. If so, please leave a comment or question in the reply box below.

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