California Falconry Hunting Seasons, Laws, and Locations

Falconry for California hunting seasons.

Here, we fetch up laws and locations for California falconry hunting seasons, including falconry licenses, permits, and stamps. In addition to hunting limits, seasons, hours, and locations, we also retrieve rules for raptor facilities, breeding, capturing, training, banding, hacking, imping, releasing, transferring, and transporting. Moreover, we bring back laws for buying and selling raptors, record keeping, reporting, and important definitions. Finally, we include other useful info, pictures, links, blogs, and forums.


Topics

Here, we retrieve an alphabetical list of topics for California falconry hunting seasons.

  1. California falconry hunting seasonsBag & Possession Limits.
  2. Banding and Re-banding.
  3. Breeding (“Propagation”).
  4. Buying (see Selling & Buying).
  5. Carcasses.
  6. Capture.
  7. Definitions.
  8. Education.
  9. Falconry.
  10. Facilities.
  11. Forum & Blog.
  12. Feathers.
  13. General Rules.
  14. Hawking Hours.
  15. Hybrids.
  16. Licenses.
  17. Links.
  18. Permits.
  19. Property Damage.
  20. Public Falconry Areas.
  21. Records.
  22. Rehabilitators.
  23. Releasing to the Wild.
  24. Reporting.
  25. Seasons & Limits.
  26. Selling.
  27. Stamps.
  28. Training (e.g. hacking).
  29. Transfers.
  30. Transport.

NOTE: Images courtesy of Molly Bryden, 2016.


Definitions

The following definitions apply to California falconry hunting seasons.

Abatement

“Abatement” is the use of trained raptors to reduce conflicts between humans and wildlife. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(1).

Captive-Bred Raptor

Under federal law, “bred in captivity or captive-bred” refers to raptors, including eggs, hatched in captivity from parents that mated or otherwise transferred gametes in captivity. See 50 CFR § 21.3.

Under California law, “captive-bred raptor” means the progeny of a mating of raptors in captivity, or progeny produced through artificial insemination. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(2).

Captivity

Under federal law, “captivity” means that a live raptor is held in a controlled environment that is intensively manipulated by man for the purpose of producing raptors of selected species, and that has boundaries designed to prevent raptors, eggs or gametes of the selected species from entering or leaving the controlled environment. General characteristics of captivity may include, but are not limited to, artificial housing, waste removal, health care, protection from predators, and artificially supplied food. See 50 CFR § 21.3.

Capture

“Capture” means to trap or capture or attempt to trap or capture a raptor from the wild. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(3).

Eagles

California falconry hunting seasons“Eagles” includes golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), and Steller’s sea-eagle (Haliaeetus pelagicus).See 14 CCR § 670(b)(4).

Exotic Raptor

“Exotic raptor” is a raptor that has no subspecies occurring naturally in the wild in the United States and is not covered under the MBTA. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(5).

Eyas Raptor

“Eyas raptor” or “nestling” is a young raptor not yet capable of flight. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(6).

Falconry

California falconry hunting seasonsUnder federal law, “falconry” is caring for and training raptors for pursuit of wild game, and hunting wild game with raptors. Falconry includes the taking of raptors from the wild to use in the sport; and caring for, training, and transporting raptors held for falconry. See 50 CFR § 21.3.

Under California law, “falconry” means the possession, housing, trapping, transport, and use of raptors for the purpose of hunting or free flight training. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(7).

Hacking of Falconry Raptors

Under federal law, “hacking” is the temporary release of a raptor held for falconry to the wild so that it must survive on its own. It’s a method approved by the USFWS for getting a raptor ready for falconry. See 50 CFR § 21.3. and 21.29(e)(2).

Under California law, “hacking” is the temporary or permanent release of a raptor held for falconry to the wild so that it may survive on its own. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(8).

Hybrid Raptor

Under federal law, “hybrid” means any bird that results from a cross of genetic material between two separate taxa when one or both are listed at 50 CFR 10.13, and any progeny of those birds. See 50 CFR § 21.3.

“Hybrid raptor” means offspring of raptors of two or more distinct species listed in Title 50, CFR, Section 10.13. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(9).

Imping

Under federal law, “imping” is replacing a damaged feather with a molted feather. When a feather gets damaged, it can’t heal itself (sort of like a fingernail for humans). Instead, the feather has to be replaced. It can happen naturally through “molting.” You can also repair the feather by “imping.” See 50 CFR §21.29(f)(12) and Rehabilitators below.

Under California law, “imp” is to cut a broken or damaged feather and replace or repair it with an undamaged feather. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(10).

Imprint

California falconry hunting seasonsUnder federal law, “imprint,” for the purposes of falconry, means a bird that is hand-raised, from 2 weeks of age until it has fledged, and has identified itself with humans rather than its own species. An imprinted bird is considered to be so for its entire lifetime. See 50 CFR § 21.3.

“Imprint” means a raptor that is hand-raised in isolation from the sight of other raptors from two weeks of age until it has fledged. An imprinted raptor is considered to be so for its entire lifetime. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(11).

Livestock Depredation Area

“Livestock depredation area” means a specific geographic location in which depredation by golden eagles has been recognized. The boundaries and duration of a livestock depredation area are declared by U.S.D.A. Wildlife Services or by a State governor. See 50 CFR § 21.3.

Non-Native Raptor

“Non-native raptor” is any raptor that does not naturally occur in California. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(12).

Passage Raptor

“Passage raptor” is a juvenile raptor less than one year old that is capable of flight. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(13).

Permit

“Permit” means any document designated as a “permit,” “license,” “certificate,” or any other document issued by the Service to authorize, limit, or describe activity and signed by an authorized official of the Service. See 50 CFR § 21.10.

Raptor

California falconry hunting seasonsUnder federal law, “raptor” means a migratory bird of the Order Accipitriformes, the Order Falconiformes, or the Order Strigiformes listed in §10.13 of this chapter, including the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). See 50 CFR § 21.3.

“Raptor” means any bird of the Order Falconiformes, Accipitriformes or Strigiformes, or a hybrid thereof. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(14).

Wild Raptor

Under federal law, when you remove a raptor from the wild it’s always considered “wild.” That’s true not matter how long you keep it, even if you transfer it to someone else. However, it’s only considered to be “taken from the wild” by the person who originally captured it. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(1).

Under California law, a “wild raptor” means a raptor removed from the wild for falconry. It is considered a wild captured raptor, no matter its time in captivity or whether it is transferred to other licensees or permit types. See 14 CCR § 670(b)(16).

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General Laws

California falconry hunting seasonsThe main federal law for California falconry hunting seasons is the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). It applies because raptors are migratory birds. That means that they tend to fly across state lines. The MBTA applies to anyone who has at least one falcon to use in falconry. It’s true for “wild-cause, captive bred, or hybrid raptors.” Another major falconry law is the Bald and Gold Eagle Protection Act. It allows you to take a golden eagle from the wild and use it in falconry, but only if it’s taken because it’s causing damage to livestock or wildlife. See 16 USC 688a.

The California Fish & Game Commission (FGC) and Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW) can also pass laws for California falconry hunting seasons. They have to meet the federal standards. California laws can be tougher–but not easier–and have to be consistent with federal law. See 50 CFR § 21.29(b) and 14 CCR § 670.

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Bag & Possession Limits

See Seasons & Limits below.

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Banding and Re-Banding

In general, the falcons listed below have to be banded:

    1. Goshawk.
    2. Harris’s hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus).
    3. Peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus).
    4. Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus)
California falconry hunting seasons
Goshawk

The band has to be permanent, non reusable, and numbered with the USFWS leg band, which you get from the CDFW. In addition to the band, you can also implant certain microchips. If the band is removed or lost, you have five days to either request a new one or implant a microchip and report it to the CDFW. In general, if the band is causing a health problem, you can take it off. These rules are true for raptors taken from the wild or received from another person.

If you get the bird from another person, you have to report the band number. If the bird was bred in captivity, it has to be banded with a seamless USFWS metal band. If the band is removed or lost, you have five days to request a new one.

Warning shots!!! You cannot use a seamless numbered band for birds taken from the wild. If you’re planning to catch a bird, you can ask for the band ahead of time. In addition to the band, you can also implant certain microchips. See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(6), 50 CFR § 21.30, and Reporting below.

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Breeding / Propagation

The law refers to breeding as “captive propagation.” For California falconry hunting seasons, we just use the word breeding.

Falconry Raptors

In general, you can use your falconry raptor for captive breeding. The person who does the breeding has to have a “propagation permit.” If you use your bird for less than eight months per year for breeding, you don’t have to transfer it from the falconry permit. If you do transfer the bird, it has to be banded. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(7), 50 CFR § 21.30, and Permits below.

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Carcasses

Bands & Microchips

Many falconry birds are identified with a band or microchip. If you had one of these birds, and it died, you can usually keep the body. You can use the feathers for “imping.” You can also have the bird mounted by a Taxidermist. You can use the mount for giving conservation education programs. You have to leave the band or microchip in place. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(13).

Golden Eagles

If you had a golden eagle for falconry, and it died, you have to send the entire body to the National Eagle Repository. Warning shot!!! This includes the body, feathers, talons, and other parts. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(13).

Other Species

California falconry hunting seasonsIf you had a falconry bird, and it died, you can donate it to any person or place with a permit to possess it. This is also true for the feathers. There are special rules for Band & Microchips and Golden Eagles (see Banding and Re-Banding above). See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(13).

If you don’t donate the bird or keep the body, you can keep the flight feathers for as long as you have a falconry permit. Otherwise, you have ten days to destroy the body and or feathers (e.g. burn it). The time begins after death or a vet determines the cause of death.

Warning shots!!! If the bird was euthanized, you have to keep it from poisoning other scavengers. You can’t buy or sells the feathers. You have to keep whatever paperwork you received when you got the bird. There are special rules for Golden Eagles (see below). See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(13) and 14 CCR § 670(h)(9).

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Capturing

Aplomado Falcon

When trapping bird for the California falconry hunting seasons, you have to make sure you don’t catch a Northern Aplomado Falcon. That would be a violation of the Endangered Species Act. The law requires that you take certain precautions in certain counties. None of those counties are in California. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(18) for details.

Banded Birds

In general, you can take most raptors from the wild if they had a Federal Bird Banding Laboratory aluminum band. The only exception is for banded peregrine. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3)(iii) – (iv).

Bird Age Limit

California falconry hunting seasonsIn general, General and Master Falconers can only take from the wild raptors less than one year old. There’s an exception for American Kestrel and great horned owls, which can be taken at any age. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3).

Eagles

For the California falconry hunting seasons, Masters Falconers with a permit can take no more than three eagles. That includes possessing and transporting them. It includes golden, white-tailed, and Steller’s eagles. Each counts toward your limit. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3)(viii).

Endangered Birds

Normally, Generals and Masters can only take one threatened species from the wild per year. However, you have to have a special permit. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3)(ix).

Falconry

You can take no more than two raptors from the wild per year to use for California falconry hunting seasons.. It counts toward your limit even if you transfer it to another person that same year. It will not count toward that person’s limit, though it will always be considered a wild bird. If you’re responsible for reporting the take, you have to do it within ten days of capture.

If someone else captures the bird for you, and you were present, you have to file the 3-186A form. If you’re not present for the capture, the person taking it must be a General or Master. They have to file the form. If they transfer it to you, both of you have to file the form. It will count to the other persons limit–not yours. Warning shot!!! Generals and Masters can take babies from the nest or “aerie.” See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(2), Golden Eagles below, Falconry, and Reporting.

Golden Eagles

California falconry hunting seasonsUnder very limited circumstances, federal law allows Masters to capture golden eagles. First, it has to be captured in an area where the birds are harming livestock. Second, it has to be while the harm is taking place. Third, you have to have a “depredation permit.” Finally, you can’t take any more than two birds per year. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(1)(v) and Permits below.

Under very limited circumstances, Masters can also capture golden eagle for the California falconry hunting seasons. First, it has to be causing damage to livestock or wildlife. Second, it has to be while the harm is taking place. Third, you have to have a “depredation permit.” This includes immature or “subadult” golden eagles. There’s also exceptions for nestlings.

Warning shots!!! Before you start trapping, you have to inform law enforcement of the USFWS by email t0 enforcement@fws.gov. You can also do it in person, over the phone, or by fax. Make sure you get permission from the landowner or public manager. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3)(ii).

Injured Birds

If you injure a bird during trapping, you’re responsible for the cost of care and rehab. You can either put it on your permit and have it treated. You can also give the bird to a vet. Instead of using a vet, you can also use a qualified wildlife rehabilitator or wildlife agency. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(5) and Rehabilitators below.

Nestlings

California falconry hunting seasons
Cooper’s Hawk with Nestlings

If you’re allowed to take a nestling, you always have to leave at least one young in the nest or “aerie.” Warning shot!!! Apprentice cannot take a nestling from the wild. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3)(vi) and (vii).

Recapture

If you lose a bird, you can always recapture it. That’s not considered a “take” from the wild. You can also recapture a wild one wearing equipment or captive-bred bird even if you’re not allowed to posses that species. It doesn’t count toward your limit. You have to report it within five days. You have to give it back to the owner. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3)(iii) – (iv).

Reports

If you capture a raptor from the wild, you have to file a Resident Falconer Raptor Capture, Recapture and Release Report (DFW360f) within five days. Also see Reporting below.

Violations

It’s illegal to intentionally capture a raptor that’s not part of your classification. Even if you catch it unintentionally, you have to let it go right away. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(1) and (2).

Wild Raptors

When you remove a raptor from the wild it’s always considered “wild.” That’s true not matter how long you keep it, even if you transfer it to someone else. However, it’s only considered to be “taken from the wild” by the person who originally captured it. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(1).

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Education Programs

Conservation Education

Generals and Masters can use their birds in conservation education programs for the public. However, you must have a Federal education permit. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(8) for details.

Photography & Filming

There’s a limited exception to use falconry raptors for photography and filming. First, it has to be about migratory bird (e.g. the practice of falconry, biology, ecology, or conservation). Second, it has to be offered to the public free. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(9) for details.

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Facilities

For more details on all of the subjects in the Section, see 50 CFR § 21.29(d).

Custody

In general, you can leave your raptor with another person with a permit. However, you can’t leave it there more than 120 days. You also have to give written permission to that person and a copy of your FWS 3-186A form. In general, another person can come take care of your falcon, even if they don’t have a permit. However, they can’t do it more than 45 days. The time can be extending under certain circumstances (e.g. illness, military service, and family emergencies). See Reporting below.

Equipment

All falcons must be kept in “humane and healthful conditions.” At minimum, you must have “jesses” (or the materials and equipment to make them), plus a leash and swivel, bath container, and a scale or balance to weigh them.

Inspections

In general, the CDFW can inspect your equipment and records any day of the week during regular business hours. However, they have to do it in your present.

License

You need a Falconry License to have a facility. If you spend part of your time in another State, you may have to get a Falconry License for that state too.

Traveling

When traveling, you have to have a perch and protection from extreme temperatures, wind, and disturbances (e.g. a “giant hood”). In general, you can keep your falcon in temporary housing. However, you can’t have it away from home more than 120 days. You also have to have a perch and provide protection from other animals and extreme temperatures, wind, and disturbances.

Travel

If you spend part of your time in another State, you may have to get a falconry permit there too. If you’re there more than 120 days in a row, your facility has to meet all the regular requirements.

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Falconry

Endangered Species

California falconry hunting seasons for the California Condor Range hunting,Any time you’re near a threatened or endangered wildlife, you have to make sure you don’t Take one of those species. Take even includes things like disrupting normal behavior. There a federal and State birds and mammals on those lists.

Warning shots!!! Don’t fly near those species during the California falconry hunting seasons. If you accidentally take one, you have to leave it there if it’s dead. If it’s just injured, you have to take it to the closes rehab center. Wishin also have to report it to the closest USFWS Ecological Services Field Office and the nearest CDFW regional office (www.dg.ca.gov/regions/). You have to report within ten days.

See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(17), 14 CCR § 670(d), and Rehabilitators below.

Motor Vehicles

In general, it’s illegal to “pursue, drive, herd, or take any bird or mammal from any type of motor-driven air or land vehicles, motorboat, airboat, sailboat, or snowmobile.” As such, it would be illegal to release a falcon from a moving vehicle. See 14 CFR § 251.

Prey

California falconry hunting seasonsIf your falcon kills an animal without your intent, you can let it eat the animal. This includes animals taken outside of hunting seasons. However, you cannot keep the animal. If it’s a threatened or endangered species, you have to report it to the Ecological Services Field Office in that area. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(19).

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Feathers

Imping

California falconry hunting seasonsWhen a feather gets damaged, it can’t heal itself (sort of like a fingernail for humans). Instead, the feather has to be replaced. It can happen naturally through “molting.” You can also repair the feather by “imping,” which usually involves glueing on a replacement feather.

For “imping,” you’re normally allowed to posses tail and wing feathers from a falconry bird. However, you can only have them if they’re from a bird allowed under your permit. You can can have molted feathers (sheds) or get them from other people with a falconry permit. You can also get them from wildlife rehabilitators and breeders (see Breeding and Rehabilitators above).

Warning shots!!! You cannot buy, sell, or barter feathers from a falconry bird. You cannot donate golden eagle feathers. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(12) and Definitions above.

Molting

Most raptors only molt about once a year (i.e. shed damaged feathers). In general, you don’t have to gather molted or damaged feathers. You can leave them where they fall, save them for “Imping,” or destroy them. For golden eagles, you have keep the flight feathers (“retrices”). If you don’t keep them for imping, you have to send them to the National Eagle. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(12).

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Hawking Hours

Falconry for California hunting seasons“Hawking hours” for the California falconry hunting seasons are the hours in which you can hunt birds and mammals with a falcon. The hours change depending on what you wish to hunt. See 14 CCR § 670(c).

Migratory Game Birds

In general, the hawking hours for Migratory Game Birds are from one-half (½) hour before sunrise until sunset (Band-tailed Pigeon, Ducks, Geese, Coot, Moorhen, white-winged and mourning Doves, and Snipe). See 14 CCR § 300(b).

Nongame Birds

In general, hawking hours for Nongame Birds are from from one-half (1/2) hour before sunrise until one-half (1/2) after sunset. The main bird is the American Crow.

Small Game Mammals

California falconry hunting seasonsIn general, the hawking hours for Resident Small Game are from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Those mammals include Tree Squirrels and Rabbits.

Upland Game Birds

In general, the hawking hours for Upland Game Birds are from sunrise to sunset (Pheasant, Quail, Chukar, Grouse,* white-tailed Ptarmigan, and Turkey). Warning shot!!! A sage grouse permit is required and the application must specify falconry. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(1)(D)(6) and (a)(3)(A)-(F).

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Hybrids

If you fly a hybrid raptor for the California falconry hunting seasons, and it’s flown free, at least two radio transmitters must be attached to help with location. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(8).

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Licenses

Before hunting during the California falconry hunting seasons, you need Falconry License from the California Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW). Federal law refers to it as a “Permit,” but there are several kinds of permits (see below).

Age Limit

You have to be at least 12 years old to get an Apprentice Falconry License.

Apprentice Falconry License

Age Limit

To get an Apprentice Falconry License, you have to be at least 12 years old.

Application

When you go to take the Exam (see below), take a completed New Falconry License Application (FG 360b). If you’re under 18, your parent or guardian has to sign it and is legally responsible for your activities.

Exam

Before you can get an Apprentice Falconry License, you have to pass an Exam (see below). When you go to take your Exam, bring your Falconry Application Fee and your Examination Fee, which in 2016 were $14.68 and $51.25. Also bring photo ID.

To get an Apprentice Falconry License, you need a letter from a Master or General Falconer. That person has to be an adult with a Falconry License. That person has to have at least two years of experience as a General Falconer.

California falconry hunting seasonsUnder federal law, you can’t have a threatened or endanger species. There are few others you can’t have (e.g. bald, white-tailed, Steller’s sea, and golden eagles). Under California law, you can only have a Red-Tailed Hawk or an American Kestrel. You can only have one falcon to use in falconry.

If you catch your falcon, you can’t take a baby from the nest. You can’t have one that “imprinted” on humans. You don’t have to catch your own, though, it can be transferred to you from another person with a Permit.

See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(2)(i) and (3) and 14 CCR § 670(e)(6)(A).

Classifications

There are three classes of Falconry Licenses for the California falconry hunting seasons:

    1. Apprentice Falconry License
    2. General Falconry License
    3. Master Falconry License

The class determines which raptors you can possess, how many, and other things like whether you need to take the Exam.

Exam

California falconry hunting seasonsIf this is your first Falconry License, you have to pass a written exam. You have to be at least 12 years old to take it. The exam is supervised and is a closed book test. It should take no longer than two hours to complete. It covers your knowledge about falconry laws. It tests your ability to care for raptors (e.g. diseases and sanitation). Finally, it measures your knowledge about the history of birds of prey (e.g. bird identification and habits). You have to pass with at least an 80%. They give you the result right away. If you fail, you can take it again on the next business day.

When you’re ready to take the exam, set up an appointment with a one CDFW Wildlife Office (see Requirements For Obtaining a Falconry License). A good educational resource is the California Hawking Club.

Warning shot!!! In 2015, there were signs of avian influenza in birds from Washington. If you notice signs of illness or death in your captive birds, call the Sick Bird Hotline at 1-866-922-2473. To report a death contact CDFW’s Wildlife Investigations Laboratory at 1-916-358-2790 or online. See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(2)(i) and (3) and 14 CCR § 670(e)(6)(A).

Facilities & Equipment

After passing your falconry Exam, file the New Falconry Application and Raptor Facilities and Falconry Equipment Inspection Report (FG 360d). Also send the Inspection Fee and pay for your Falconry License, which in 2016 were $273+ and $81.63. The CDFW will schedule an appointment. If you pass, they’ll send your Falconry License. It takes up to 45 business days to get your License. See Facilities above.

Fees

There’s a fee for the falconry application, examination, and inspection of your facilities. See 14 CCR § 670(e)(7).

Hunting License

In addition to a Falconry License, you also have to get a California Hunting License. Your licenses are valid from July 1 through June 30, regardless of when you bought them. Warning shots!!! You have to carry them with you while hunting. See FGC § 396.

Renewal

To renew your Falconry License, you have to file the Falconry License Renewal Application (DFW360). Click here to renew online. For more info, go to Falconry License Renewal Notice from the CDFW.

Residency

In general, a Falconry License is available for California residents and non-residents. To capture a rapture, non-residents have to file a Non-Resident Application for a Raptor Capture Permit. You also have to pay the fee for a Non-Resident Raptor Capture Permit, which was a fee of $334.50 in 2016.

See FGC § 395(b), FGC § 396, 14 CCR § 670(a)-(e), and 703(b). Click here for info from the CDFW (e.g. applications, report forms, fees).

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Links

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Permits

When hunting during the California falconry hunting seasons, you have to carry an original permit. You also have to carry any additional documents that authorize you to practice falconry (e.g. Falconry License). The kind you need depends on the activity (e.g. hunting, trapping, training, and flying). See 14 CCR §§ 670(a).

Abatement

California falconry hunting seasonsAnimals like rodents can become a problem. In general, you can use a falconry bird to get rid of them. However, you need what’s called a “Special Purpose Abatement” permit. While only Masters can get the permit, General can take care of the problem under the Master’s permit. You can get paid for providing these services. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(11) for details.

Education Permit

See Education Programs: Conservation Education above.

Falconry Permits

To hunting during any California falconry hunting season, you have to have a permit. You also need it to take a falcon from the wild. To qualify, you have to submit certain information when you apply (e.g. proof of passing the falconry test, letters of recommendation, certifications, etc.) There are three kinds of permits: Apprentice Falconer, General Falconer, and Master Falconer (see below). Each applications has different requirements. See 50 CFR § 21.29(a)(1), (a)(9), (c)(7), and (f), and 14 CCR § 670(e).

Apprentice

To advance to a General Falconer, you have to have a Falconry License (see above) and a sponsor for at least two years. You have to be at least 16 years old. If you’re 16 or 17, your parent or guardian has to sign your application and is legally responsible for your activities.

You also have to file the Apprentice Falconer’s Annual Progress Report. Your sponsor has to be a General or Master. They have to show that you have at least two years of experience as an Apprentice. They have to show you have at least four months experience in “maintaining, training, flying, and hunting the raptor(s).” Your Report has to summaries the species you possess, how often each was flow, and the methods of capture and release you used.

General Falconer

To become a General, you have to advance from the Apprentice level (see above). Under federal law, you can’t have bald, white-tailed, Steller’s sea or golden eagles). You can use captive-bred and hybrids of those you’re allowed to have. You can’t have any more than three raptors. See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(2)(ii) and 14 CCR § 670(e)(6)(B).

Master Falconer

California falconry hunting seasonsTo become a Master Falconer, you need at least five years as a General. In general, you can have any kind you except a bald eagle. If you meet special qualifications, you can also have a golden, white-tailed, or Steller’s sea eagle. You can also have captive-bred and hybrids of the ones you’re allowed to have.

You can’t have any more than five wild raptors (including goldens). In general, you can have as many captive-bred raptors as you want. However, you have to be training them for and using them to hunt.

See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(2)(iii) and (iv) [qualifications for golden, white-tailed, and Steller’s sea eagles] and and 14 CCR § 670(e)(6)(C).

Import/Export

You need a special permit to import or export a falconry raptor to another county. With it, you don’t need a migratory bird import/export permit. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(15) for details.

Private Property

You don’t need a special permit to capture a falconry bird on private land. However, you have to get permission from the landowner before doing it. This is also true for flying and releasing falconry birds. Warning shot!!! See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(16).

Public Land

You don’t need a special permit to capture a falconry bird on Public Land. However, the activity has to be authorized for the area. This is also true for flying and releasing falconry birds. Warning shot!!! See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(16).

Suspension & Revocation

Your permit can be revoke or suspend. After it’s over, you can ask for it to be restored. You can appeal a license denial, suspension, or revocation. See 50 CFR § 21.29(b)(8) and (i), and 14 CCR § 670(e)(9)-(11). If you need help, contact our attorney.

Practicing

In general, you can let someone else hold or practice flying your raptor. They don’t need their own permit as long as it’s short-term and under your direct supervision. See 50 CFR § 21.29(a)(2).

Warning shot!!! You also need a Federal Duck Stamp to hunt Migratory Game Birds. See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(1).

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Property Damage

California falconry hunting seasons
Goshawk

Some animals cause damage to property. Under federal law, there’s a list of those species. Under the “depredation order,” you can take those species any times. However, you have to follow the rules in each order. See 50 CFR § 21.43-.46 and 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(20).

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Records

Falconers have to keep all their falconry-related records for at least five years. Those records include your falconry license and any records of transfer, capture, release, annual reports, health records, etc. 14 CCR §(e)(12).

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Rehabilitators

You can get a raptor from a rehabilitator. The bird can be of any age. You can acquire any species you’re allowed to have under you permit. You have to file a report within ten days. It also counts toward your limit for birds taken from the wild. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(7), Reporting above, and Releasing to the Wild below.

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Releasing to the Wild

Hybrids

It’s illegal to permanently release a hybrid raptor into the wild. You can transfer it to another person, though. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(9).

Native Captive-Bred Raptors

Falconry for California hunting seasons.California law applies if you wish to return a bird to the wild that is native to California. You need permission from the CDFW to release a captive-bred raptor to the wild. If you do it, you have to allow the bird to adjust (i.e. “hack”). You do this by temporarily releasing the bird into the wild at the appropriate time of year and location. You also have to remove any band it might have. Finally, you have to report the release. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(9), (f)(2), and Reporting below.

Native Wild Raptors

California law applies if you wish to return a bird to the wild that is native to California. When you release it, you have to do it at the appropriate time of year and location. You have to remove its band and report the release. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(9) and Reporting below.

Non-Native Raptors

It’s illegal to permanently release a non-native raptor into the wild. You can transfer it to another person, though. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(9).

Rehabilitation

Under federal law, Generals and Masters can help Migratory Bird rehabilitators in conditioning raptors for release into the wild. In general, you can keep the bird in your facilities. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(10)for details.

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Reporting

There are over 20 situations in which you need to file a report. A few of the major scenarios are listed below.

    1. You acquire a raptor.
    2. You capture a raptor.
    3. You microchip a raptor.
    4. You re-band a raptor.
    5. You transfer a raptor.
    6. You lose a raptor to the wild and don’t find it in 30 days.
    7. Your falconry bird dies.
    8. You raptor is stolen.
    9. You take wildlife with your raptor.

Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submission showing that one of those things happened. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6)(ii) and 14 CCR §(e)(12).

Form 3-186A Systems

California falconry hunting seasonsUnder federal law, you have to report the take, loss, or transfer of falconry birds. You have to use Form 3-186A (Migratory Bird and Disposition Report). First time filers have to get a Federal Identifier. They send you the ID number and Form 3-186A. After that, click here to Login to the “3-186A System.”). California law requires that you comply with the federal electronic reporting system. You can also send your forms to the License and Revenue Branch of the CDFW, but you have to pay a fee for each form submitted. See 50 CFR § 21.29(b)(2)(i) – (ii), 14 CCR § 670(f)(1), and 14 CCR § (e)(7)(E).

Acquisition

If you acquire a raptor, you have to file Form 3-186A within five days (ten days under federal law). Send it to USFW’s Sacramento Office or file it online. Send a copy to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch at 1740 N. Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. This is also true if you get the bird from a Rehabilitator. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submission showing that this happened. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6)(ii) and (f), 14 CCR § 670(h)(3), Band Numbers, and Rehabilitators below.

Advancement From Apprentice

To advance from the Apprentice class, you have to file an Apprentice Falconer’s Annual Progress Report. See 14 CCR § 670(e)(6)(A)(6.).

Band Numbers

If you band or re-band a raptor, you have to file Form 3-186A within five days (ten days under federal law). The same is true whether it’s a wild, captive-bred, captured from the wild, or recaptured. Send the Form to USFW’s Sacramento Office or file it online. Send a copy to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch at 1740 N. Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submission showing that this happened.

When you acquire a falconry bird, you also have to report your band number when you report the acquisition . If you loose or have to replace a band for a captive-bred bird, you have to report it and request a replacement band. You have five days to file the reports. See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(6)(i)-(iii) and 14 CCR § 670(i)(2)-(3).

Federal Bird Landing Lab

If you capture a bird with a Federal Bird Banding Laboratory, you have to file a report. You also have to report any research identification numbers to the Federal Bird Banding Laboratory at 1-800-327-2263. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(3)(v) and 14 CCR § 670(g)(8).

Special Birds

If you capture from the wild a goshawk, peregrine, glyfalcon, or Harris’s hawk, you have to report the microchip and band number on Form 3-186A. See 14 CCR § 670(i)(1).

Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submissions. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6)(ii).

Breeding

In general, you can breed raptors if you have a Propogation Permit. If you transfer one to the permit, you have to report it on Form 3-186A in the USFW’s electronic system. See 14 CCR § 670(h)(14)(B).

Capture & Re-Capture

Falconry for California hunting seasonsWhen you capture a falconry raptor from the wild, you have to file two reports. First, you have to go online and file Form 3-186A. Second, you have to file CDFW’s Resident Falconer Raptor Capture, Recapture and Release Report (DFW360f). Under federal law, you have ten days to file the report. However, under California law, you only have five days.

File the same reports if you: (1) were present at the capture site; (2) weren’t present, but the bird is transferred to you later; and (3) re-capture a raptor with falconry equipment, a captive-bred, or exotic raptor. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submissions. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6)(i), (e)(2)(v)-(vi), (e)(3)(iv), and 14 CCR § 670(f)(2), 14 CCR § 670(g)(4), and 14 CCR § 670(h)(10).

Change of Name or Address

You also have to notify the CDFW License and Revenue Branc if you change your name, mailing address, or facility address. You have to do it within 30 days of the chance. See 14 CCR § 670(e)(13).

Death

If your raptor dies, you have to file Form 3-186A within five days (ten days under federal law). Send it to USFW’s Sacramento Office or file it online. Send a copy to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch at 1740 N. Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834.

Warning shots!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submission showing that this happened. In 2015, there were signs of avian influenza in birds from Washington. If you notice signs of illness or death in your captive birds, call the Sick Bird Hotline at 1-866-922-2473. To report a death contact CDFW’s Wildlife Investigations Laboratory at 1-916-358-2790 or online. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6) and 14 CCR § 670(h)(8).

Endangered or Threatened Species

If your falconry bird kills an endangered or threatened species, you have to report it to the nearest Ecological Services Field Office of the USFWS. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(19) and 14 CCR § 670(d)

Expiration of License

When your license expires, you ten days to file an annual report using the Falconry Hunting Take Report. File the report with the License and Revenue Branch of the CDFW. Warning shot!!! If you’re an Apprentice, you also have to file the Apprentice Falconer’s Annual Progress Report. See 14 CCR § 670(f)(3)-(4) for details.

Facilities

If you move your falconry facility, you have five days to report it to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch. Use the Raptor Facilities and Falconry Equipment Inspection Report. See 14 CCR § 670(j)(1)(E).

Hunting Take Report

If you have a falconry raptor, you have to report how did. You have to file a Falconry Hunting Take Report. You to file it when you apply for renewal of your Falconry license or within ten days after it expires, whichever comes first. See 14 CCR § 670(f)(3)-(4) for details.

Inspections

If you get a new facility, renew your license, or move to a new address, the CDFW will do an inspection. You have to initiate the inspection by filing the Raptor Facilities and Falconry Equipment Inspection Report. See 14 CCR § 670(j)(3).

Inured Raptors

If you hurt a falcon during the capture, you have to file a report if you put it on your falconry permit. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(5)(v) and 14 CCR § 670(g)(9).

Inspection

In general, the CDFW can inspect your equipment and records any day of the week during regular business hours. However, they have to do it in your present.

Loss

California falconry hunting seasonsIf you lose your raptor and don’t find it within 30 days, you have to file Form 3-186A within five days (ten days under federal law). Send it to USFW’s Sacramento Office or file it online. Send a copy to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch at 1740 N. Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submission showing that this happened. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6) and 14 CCR § 670(h)(8).

Microchips

If you microchip a raptor, you have to file a report within ten days. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submissions. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6).

Northern Goshawk or Prairie Falcon

California falconry hunting seasons
Goshawk

If you capture a Northern Goshawk or prairie falcon, you have to report it on Form 3-186A. Warning shot!!! You have to be successful drawn to even try to capture one. To apply, use the Special Raptor Capture Drawing Application. You also have to pay the Application Fee. See 14 CCR § 670(g)(7)(K)(8).

Release

When you release a falconry raptor into the wild, you have to file two reports. First, you have to file Form 3-186A within five days (ten days under federal law). Send it to USFW’s Sacramento Office or file it online. Second, you have to file the Resident Falconer Raptor Capture, Recapture and Release Report (DFW360f). Send copies to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch at 1740 N. Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submission showing that this happened. See 14 CCR § 670(f)(2) and (9).

Renewal License

When you apply for a license renewal, you have to file an annual report using the Falconry Hunting Take Report. File the report with the License and Revenue Branch of the CDFW. Warning shot!!! If you’re an Apprentice, you also have to file the Apprentice Falconer’s Annual Progress Report. See 14 CCR § 670(f)(3)-(4) for details.

Retention

You have to keep copies of all your falconry-related records license, transfer, capture, health, etc.).

Theft

If your raptor is stolen, you have to file Form 3-186A within five days (ten days under federal law). Send it to USFW’s Sacramento Office or file it online. Send a copy to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch at 1740 N. Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. Also report the theft to the USFWS Regional Law Enforcement Office and the CDFW. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submissions. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6) and 14 CCR § 670(h)(8).

Transfer

If you transfer a raptor to another person or to another permit, you have to file Form 3-186A within five days (ten days under federal law). Send it to USFW’s Sacramento Office or file it online. Send a copy to the CDFW License and Revenue Branch at 1740 N. Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. Warning shot!!! You have to keep copies of electronic submission showing that this happened. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(6) and (f)(6) and 14 CCR § 670(h)(1).

For more details on all of the subjects in the subsection, 50 CFR § 21.29(d), 14 CCR § 670(e)(12)-(13), and 14 CCR § 670(f).

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Seasons & Limits

California falconry hunting seasonsDuring the California falconry hunting seasons, you have to follow the general rules for hunting each species of small game within the categories listed below (e.g. license, seasons, bag limits, and hours). Any additional seasons and bag limits are also noted below. See 14 CCR § 670(c).

Endangered Species

Warning shot!!! You have to avoid taking flying near species listed as endangered or threatened. If you take one unintentionally, you have to remove it from the raptor as soon as practical. You can leave it at the site. You can also deliver it to a USFWS Ecological Services Field Office, but you have to do it within ten calendar days. See 14 CCR § 670(d).

Migratory Game Birds

The Migratory Game Birds listed below may be hunted during the appropriate California falconry hunting seasons. See 507(a)(1).

American Coot

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limit for American Coot is the same as Ducks (see below).

Common Moorhen

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limit for Common Moorhen is the same as Ducks (see below).

Domesticated Migratory Game Birds

Falconry for domesticate migratory game birds is only allowed on licensed areas. See 14 CCR § 600.4(g)(3).

Doves

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limit for western and white-winged Doves is the same as for the general season. See 14 CCR § 300(b)(B).

Ducks

California falconry hunting seasonsThe California falconry hunting seasons for American Coot, Common Moorhen, Ducks, and Geese depend on the Waterfowl Zone and Special Management Area. The Daily Bag Limit for each Zone is three (3) birds. The bag can be all of one species or a mixture of the four. The Possession Limit for each Zone is nine (9) birds. See 14 CCR §§ 502(f).

Northeastern California Zone: the 2015-2016 falconry season opens with the general season for Ducks and ends on January 17, 2016.

Balance of State Zone: the 2015-2016 falconry season runs with general season for Ducks and February 6-7, 2016. Warning shot!!! In the North Coast Special Management Area, the falconry season for geese runs with the season for Small Canada geese (see 502(d)(6)).

Southern San Joaquin Valley Zone: the 2015-2016 falconry season runs with the general season for Ducks and February 1-3, 2016. Warning shot!!! Falconry for Geese is not allowed.

Southern California Zone: the 2015-2016 falconry season runs with the general season for Ducks and February 1-5, 2016. Warning shot!!! The falconry season for Geese runs with the Goose season.

Colorado River Zone: the 2015-2016 falconry season runs with the general season for Ducks and January 25-28, 2016. Warning shot!!! Falconry for Geese is not allowed.

Geese

See falconry seasons and bag limit for Geese is the same as Ducks (see below) except where noted.

Pigeon

California falconry hunting seasons
Peregrine Falcon with Pigeon.

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limit for band-tailed Pigeon is the same as for the general season. Warning shot!!! Seasons and limits depend on the hunting zone. See 14 CCR § 300(b)(A).

Snipe

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limit for common Snipe (jacksnipe) is the same as for the general season. See 14 CCR § 300(b)(C).

Nongame Birds

California falconry hunting seasons and California crow hunting seasons.The California falconry hunting seasons for Nongame Birds includes crow. The falconry season and bag limit for American Crow is the same. See 14 CCR §§ 472(d) and 485(b).

Nongame Mammals

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limits for Nongame Mammals are the same the general seasons.

Small Game Mammals

California falconry hunting seasonsFalconry is an authorized method for hunting Small Game Mammals, which includes rabbits and tree squirrels. See 14 CCR § 311.

Rabbits

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limits for Rabbits is the same as for the general season. See 14 CCR § 308.

Tree Squirrels

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limits for Tree Squirrels is the same as for the general seasons. See 14 CCR § 307(b).

Upland Game Birds

California falconry hunting seasons
Goshawk

The California falconry hunting seasons and bag limits for Upland Game Birds are listed below. See 14 CCR § 300.

Chukar

The 2015-2016 falconry season for Chukar starts on the third Saturday in August and goes through the last day in February. The daily bag limit is the same as the general season. The falconry bag limit can have birds of either sex. The hawking hours are sunrise to sunset. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(C).

Doves

The 2015-2016 falconry season for ringed-turtle and spotted Doves is from September 1 – 15. It opens again on the second Saturday in November and lasts for 45 days. There are no daily bag or possession limits. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(H).

You can hunt Eurasian Doves with a falcon all year long. There are no daily bag or possession limits. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(I).

Pheasants

The 2015-2016 California falconry hunting seasons for Pheasant starts on the third Saturday in August and goes through the last day in February. The daily bag limit is the same as the general season. The falconry bag limit can have birds of either sex. The hawking hours are sunrise to sunset. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(A).

Ptarmigan

The 2015-2016 California falconry hunting seasons for white-tailed Ptarmigan starts on the third Saturday in August and goes through the last day in February. The daily bag limit is the same as the general season. The falconry bag limit can have birds of either sex. The hawking hours are sunrise to sunset. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(E).

Quail

The 2015-2016 California falconry hunting seasons for Quail starts on the third Saturday in August and goes through the last day in February. The daily bag limit is the same as the general season. The falconry bag limit can have birds of either sex. The hawking hours are sunrise to sunset. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(B).

Sage Grouse

The 2015-2016 California falconry hunting seasons for Sage Grouse starts on the first Saturday in November and goes for 60 days, and during the general season. The daily bag and possession limits depend on the hunting zone. The hawking hours are sunrise to sunset.

Warning shot!!! You need a special permit to hunt sage grouse. To hunt during the falconry-only season, you have to put it on our application. You’re also limited to a specific hunting zone. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(1)(D)(5)-(6) and (3)(F).

Sooty & Ruffed Grouse

The 2015-2016 California falconry hunting seasons forRuffed and Sooty/Blue Grouse starts on the third Saturday in August and goes through the last day in February. The daily bag limit is the same as the general season. The falconry bag limit can have birds of either sex. The hawking hours are sunrise to sunset. Warning shot!!! You’re also limited to a specific hunting zone. See See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(D).

Turkey

The 2015-2016 California falconry hunting seasons for fall Turkey starts on the second Saturday in November and goes for 30 days. The daily bag limit is one of either sex. The possession limit is two per season. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(G).

The 2015-2016 California falconry hunting seasons for spring Turkey starts on the last Saturday in March and goes for 37 days. The daily bag limit is one bearded turkey. The possession limit is two per season. See 14 CCR § 300(a)(3)(G).

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Selling & Buying

Captive-Bred Raptors

In general, you can buy or sell captive-bred raptors from another person allowed to have them. Warning shot!!! Under federal law, they have to be marked with seamless bands. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(4).

Rehabilitators

See Rehabilitators above.

Wild Raptors

It’s illegal to buy or sell wild raptors. They only thing you can do is transfer them. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(4) and Transfers below.

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Stamps

Upland Game Bird Stamp for California falconry hunting seasonsYou need a California Hunting License and Falconry License. When hunting Upland Game Birds with a falcon, you also need an Upland Game Bird Stamp. When hunting Migratory Game Birds, you need a Federal Duck Stamp and California Duck Stamp.

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Transfers

You can transfer raptors to another falconer. There’s no limit on how many you can transfer. That’s true for wild-caught and captive-bred raptors. Warning shot!!! You cannot exceed your possession limit. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(10) and Reporting below.

Captive-Bred Falconry Raptors

In general, you can transfer captive-bred falconry raptors if the recipient has all the right permits. You have to report the transfer within ten days. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(6)and Reporting above.

Death of the Owner

If a person with a falconry permit dies, the legal representative can transfer the bird to another person authorized to have the bird. This has to happen within 90 days. After that, the proper authority has discretion to take care of it. See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(21).

Wild-Caught Falconry Raptors

In general, you can transfer wild-caught raptors caught for falconry to another permit type. However, the recipient has to have all the right permits (e.g. “propagation permit” and “wildlife rehabilitator.” See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(5) for details.

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Training

Conditioning

There are several practices acceptable for training and conditioning your falcon. They include, but are not limited to, the practices listed below.

    1. Tethered flying (“creance”).
    2. Lures.
    3. Balloons.
    4. Kites.
    5. Fly at pen-raised animals.

See 50 CFR § 21.29(f)(3).

Hacking

Falconry for California hunting seasons“Hacking” is the temporary release of a raptor into the wild. It’s a method approved by the USFWS for getting a raptor ready for falconry. It can’t be done near a nesting area of a threatened or endanger bird (or anywhere it could hurt or disturb one). Warning shot!!! Contact the the USFWS and/or CDFW to make sure you’re not in one of those areas. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(2) and Definitions.

You have to be a General or Master to hack a falconry raptor. You need permission from the CDFW to hack a bird for falconry. The bird counts toward your possession limit. It has to be a bird you’re allowed to possess. It has to have two radio transmitters during hacking. See 50 CFR § 21.29(e)(2) and Definitions.

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Transporting

In general, you need a falconry permit (see Permits above) to transport your falcon to another State or out of the country. However, check the laws for each state you wish to visit. See 50 CFR § 21.29(c)(8), (f)(15), and Permits.

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Public Falconry Areas

There are many great opportunities to hunt on public land during the California falconry hunting seasons.

Ecological Reserves

Falconry is NOT allowed at Ecological Reserves. See 14 CCR § 550(dd)(1).

National Wildlife Refuges

At the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge, falconry is NOT allowed. See 50 CFR § 32.22(A)(1).

At the Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge (Type C), falconry is NOT allowed. See 14 CCR § 552(a)(6)(B).

Wildlife Areas

Type A & Type B

On Type A and Type B Wildlife Areas, raptors are typically allowed during California falconry hunting seasons. However, you can do it only for legal game and only from the first Saturday following the end of the waterfowl season through the end of the falconry pheasant season. Raptors may be used only on Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays. See 14 CCR § 550(dd)(3) and Exceptions below.

Type C

On Type C Wildlife Areas, hunting during the California falconry hunting seasons is allowed. However, you have to do it accordance with general and falconry regulations. See 14 CCR § 550(dd)(2).

Exceptions

There are a few exceptions to the general rules noted above.

At the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area (Type A), falconry is NOT allowed only on the west side. See 14 CCR § 551(0)(16).

At the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area (Type A), falconry was allowed in designated areas during the California falconry hunting seasons. However, the new regulations are silent. See 14 CCR §§ 551(q)(57)(E) and § 551(o)(62).

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Forum & Blog

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