22 California Dog Hunting Regulations and 52 Topics for Retrievers, Pointers, Hounds, Coursing, and Guard Dogs

California dog hunting regulations.
California dog hunting regulations.

Here, we fetch up major California dog hunting regulations for retrievers, pointers, hound dogs, coursing dogs, and guard dogs. In addition to dog hunting on public and private land, we retrieve them for dog control zones, training, field trials, and practically everything else you need for success. We get them from the Fish and Game Code and Title 14 of the Code of Regulations, organize them by Topic and Regulation, and include summaries and links to the text and our pages with definitions and other relevant resources.

CDFW California hunting dog regulations
CDFW California hunting dog regulations.

Warning shots!! Always confirm California dog hunting regulations with the Fish and Game Commission and search other codes and local rules,  like the Penal Code and county ordinances. While the contents of this page is not legal advice, feel free to contact our Legal Labrador for assistance. Meanwhile, you might also wish to review our summary page for Hunting Dogs for Birds and Mammals.


Topics, Definitions, and Laws Related to California Dog Hunting Regulations

Here, we fetch up topics for California dog hunting regulations, including those for hound dogs, coursing dogs, and retrievers. For each one, we retrieve the regulations, and drop links to our pages with additional hunting rules and definitions. Also, see list of regulations below with summaries and links to regulations.

California dog hunting regulations during archery seasons for deer and bear.
California dog hunting regulations during archery seasons.
  1. Archery, see 14 CCR § 265, Bear, and Deer.
  2. Baited areas, see 14 CCR § 265 and Definitions.
  3. Bear, see FGC § 39603960.2, and 3960.614 CCR § 265; and Big Game.
  4. Big game, see FGC § 396014 CCR § 265; and Bear, Elk, Deer, Pigs, Pronghorn antelope, and Bighorn Sheep.
  5. Bighorn sheep, see 14 CCR § 265 and Big game.
  6. Birds, see 14 CCR § 677 and Training.
  7. Blinds, see FGC § 3502.
  8. Bobcat, see FGC § 39603960.2, and 3960.6, and Nongame mammals.
  9. Closed seasons, see FGC § 3508FGC § 3960, and FGC § 3961.
  10. Clubs and shooting areas, see FGC § 3307.
  11. Collars, see FGC §§ 2011.5 and 2009, and 14 CCR § 265.
  12. Control, see FGC § 3008.
  13. Control zones, see 14 CCR § 265.2
  14. Deer, see FGC § 396114 CCR § 265, and Big game.
  15. Definitions, see “baited area” [14 CCR § 257.5], “dog training” [14 CCR § 265(b)], “hound dog” [FGC § 3032(a)], “hunting dog” [FGC § 2011.5(b)], “interfere with” [FGC § 2009(f)], “pursue” [FGC § 3960(a)], “take” [FGC § 86].
  16. Dogs as blinds, see Blinds.
  17. Domesticated game birds, see FGC § 3307 and 3508.
  18. Ecological reserves, see FGC § 3960 and 14 CCR 550(n).
  19. Elk, see FGC § 396114 CCR § 265, and Big game.
  20. Endangered, rare, and protected mammals, see FGC § 396014 CCR § 265, and Mountain lion.
  21. Enforcement, see FGC § 3960.
  22. Field trials, see FGC § 350814 CCR §§ 551(i) and 677; and Wildlife Areas.
  23. Forests (State), see 14 CCR § 1423 and 14 CCR § 1424.
  24. Furbearing mammals, see FGC § 400214 CCR § 265; and Gray fox and Raccoon.
  25. Game birds, see FGC § 35023508, and Migratory game birds.
  26. Game refuge, see FGC § 3960.
  27. GPS equipment, see Collars.
  28. Gray fox, see 14 CCR § 265 and Furbearing mammals.
  29. Guard dogs, see 3960.6.
  30. Hound dogs, see FGC § 3032 and Definitions.
  31. Interference with dog hunting rights, including field trial and training, see FGC § 2009 and Definitions.
  32. Livestock grazing permits, see FGC § 3961.
  33. Mammals, see FGC § 30323502, and 396014 CCR § 265; and Big game, Furbearing Mammals, and Nongame Mammals.
  34. Microchips, see FGC § 3032.
  35. Migratory game birds, see FGC § 3307 and Game birds.
  36. Mountain Lions, see 14 CCR § 265.
  37. National Wildlife Refuges, see Wildlife Areas.
  38. Nongame mammals, see 14 CCR § 265 and Bobcat.
  39. Number of dogs per hunter, see 14 CCR § 265.
  40. Parks and Recreation Areas, see 14 CCR § 4312.
  41. Pigs, see 14 CCR § 265 and Big game.
  42. Pronghorn antelope, see FGC § 396114 CCR § 265; and Big game.
  43. Property damage, see FGC § 3960.63960.2, and  3961, and 14 CCR § 265.
  44. Rabies, see FGC § 3008.
  45. Raccoon, see 14 CCR § 265 and Furbearing mammals.
  46. Small game mammals, see Mammals above.
  47. Training, see FGC § 350814 CCR §§ 265 , 551(i), and 677; and Definitions, Weapons, and Wildlife Areas.
  48. Traps to capture dogs, see FGC § 3003.1.
  49. Tree switching devices, see Collars.
  50. Vaccinations, see FGC § 3008 and 3032.
  51. Weapons, see 14 CCR § 265 and Training.
  52. Wildlife areas, see 14 CCR §§ 550(n) and 551(i).

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List of California Dog Hunting Regulations

Here, we fetch up major lists of California dog hunting regulations from the Fish and Game Code and Title 14 of the Code of Regulations.

Fish and Game Code (California Hunting Dog Regulations)

In this section, we retrieve a list of major California hunting dog regulations from the Fish and Game Code (FGC §).

California dog hunting regulations
California dog hunting regulations from the Fish and Game Code.
  1. FGC § 2009 prohibits and penalizes willful interference with dog hunting, plus field trials and trailing (see FGC § 12000 for penalty).
  2. FGC § 2011.5 defines “hunting dog” and generally prohibits removal of dog collars (or GPS devices) by others while in the field dog hunting.
  3. FGC § 3003.1(c) prohibits others from using steel-jawed leghold traps to capture a dog, including law enforcement.
  4. FGC § 3008 requires dog hunting owners to have them (a) vaccinated for rabies and (b) under control while hunting.
  5. FGC § 3032 authorizes a hound tag program for dog hunting mammals and would require license tags, microchip implants, vaccination records, and reporting of lost dogs.
  6. FGC § 3307 requires licensed shooting ares for domesticated migratory game birds to provide free retrievers to prevent loss of dead or injured birds.
  7. FGC § 3502 prohibits use of any live or imitation mammal (except dogs) as a blind for approaching game birds.
  8. FGC § 3508 generally prohibits hunting dog training and field trials on game birds, both wild and domesticated, during the closed season on those birds.
  9. FGC § 3960 (1) except for guard dogs per Section 3960.6, prohibits owners from allowing dogs to pursuing bear and  bobcat, and prohibits (2) big game during the mammal’s closed season, and (3) any mammal (i) in a game refuge or ecological reserve closed to hunting or (ii) fully protected, rare, or endangered and (b) allows the CDFW to take corrective actions, including dog capture or dispatch.
  10. FGC § 3960.2 when pursuing bear or bobcat with depredation permits, generally (a) restricts use of hunting dogs, (b) requires submission of reports and bear skull to the CDFW, (c) prohibits compensation to third parties for performing depredation services, and (d) prohibits sale or purchase of the bear parts.
  11. FGC § 3960.6 generally allows guard dogs to protect its owner’s livestock or crops from bear and bobcat, provided the dogs are either maintained with or in close proximity to the property.
  12. FGC § 3961 livestock grazing permit holders can capture or kill untagged dogs on their property if the dog is injuring or threatening to injure deer, elk, or pronghorn antelope during the mammal’s closed season; otherwise, the permit holder can only kill the dog if its owner had been notified as described.
  13. FGC § 4002 allows dog hunting for furbearing mammals.
  14. FGC § 12000 makes it an infraction or misdemeanor with fine up to $1,000 to violate Section 2009.

Title 14, Code of Regulations (California Hunting Dog Regulations)

In this section, we retrieve a list of major California hunting dog regulations from Title 14, Code of Regulations (14 CCR §).

California dog hunting regulations for small game, including rabbits and tree squirrels.
California dog hunting regulations from Title 14, Code of Regulations.
  1. 14 CCR § 265 (1) subject to closures and prohibitions, allows use of dogs (a) to pursuetake, or train on mammals (i) outside dog control zones at any time or (ii) to pursue, take, or train on mammals inside dog control zones from the opening day of the general deer season through the first Friday in April, (b) to take (i) furbearing mammals, (ii) nongame mammals, or (iii) mammals with a depredation permit; and (c) for training during limited seasons for gray fox and raccoon or any time on other mammals; (2) prohibits use of dogs to (a) pursue big game during the closed season, (b) train on big game except hunters with a deer tag may educate one dog during the general deer season or, (c) pursue or train on mammals fully-protected, threatened or endangered, (d) pursue mammals beginning within 400 yards of a baited area; (3) prohibits use of dogs (a) to take antelope, (b) during bear archery season or take bear or pursue them without a depredation permit, (c) to take or train on bobcat, or pursue them without a depredation permit, (d) during deer archery season or inside dog control zones from the first Saturday in April through the day before the opening of the general deer season, (e) to take or pursue elk, (f) take or train on mountain lion, or pursue them without a depredation permit, or (g) take bighorn sheep; (4) prohibits during training (i) the kill, capture, or injury of mammals by dogs and owners, (ii) the possession of weapons (e.g. firearm, bow, or crossbow) capable of killing, capturing, or injuring animals; (5) limits the number of dogs to no more than (i) one dog in the area where the general deer season is open, (ii) three dogs for taking wild pigs except only one dog in the area where the general deer season is open, and zero dogs where dogs are prohibited; and (6) prohibits electronic dog retrieval collars for taking mammals (e.g. treeing switches and GPS equipment).
  2. 14 CCR §55o(b)(13)-(14) defines “dog hunting” and “dog trials” at wildlife areas.
  3. 14 CCR § 550(n) allows hunting and training at wildlife areas per Section 265, and subject to site-specific restrictions per subsection 551(i) and closures in 551(o); requires dog leash in wildlife area parking lots and check station, and to be kept within 10 feet while in transit to areas for hunting, training, or trials; requires owners and handlers to control dogs at ecological reserves when not engaged in hunting, training, or trials.
  4. 14 CCR 551(i) provides dog training and trial restrictions and prohibitions at specific wildlife areas.
  5. 14 CCR § 677 allows (a) year-round training of game bird retrievers, pointers, and field trials from sunrise to sunset, but only if no wild birds are caught, injured, or killed and (b) release and take of domestically reared birds for training and field trials.
  6. 14 CCR § 1423 requires visitors to remove dog waste from State Forests campsites.
  7. 14 CCR § 1424 requires dogs to be confined, in a vehicle, on a leash, or otherwise constrained and prohibits noisy, vicious, dangerous, or disturbing dog.
  8. 14 CCR § 4312 generally allows hunting dogs at State Parks and Recreation areas and prohibits them from running loose or being outside of tent, camper or vehicle at night.

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California Dog Hunting Regulations from the Fish and Game Code

Here, we fetch up major sections of California dog hunting regulations from the Fish and Game Code (FGC § ).

FGC § 2009 (California dog hunting regulations)

Taking and Possessing in General

(a) A person shall not willfully interfere with the participation of any individual in the lawful activity of shooting, hunting, fishing, falconry, hunting dog field trials, hunting dog training, or trapping at the location where that activity is taking place.

(b) A violation of this section is punishable pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 12000.

(c) Any person convicted for a violation of this section that occurred within two years of a prior violation of this section which resulted in a conviction is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in the county jail for a period of not more than one year, by a fine of not less than one hundred dollars ($100) and not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000), or by both imprisonment and fine.

(d) This section does not apply to the actions of any peace officer or personnel of the department in the performance of their official duties. This section does not obstruct the rights and normal activities of landowners or tenants, including, but not limited to, farming, ranching, and limiting unlawful trespass.

(e) In order to be liable for a violation of this section, the person is required to have had the specific intent to interfere with the participation of an individual who was engaged in lawful shooting, hunting, fishing, falconry, hunting dog field trials, hunting dog training, or trapping.

(f) For purposes of this section, “interfere with” means any action which physically impedes, hinders, or obstructs the lawful pursuit of any of the above-mentioned activities, including, but not limited to, all of the following

(1) Actions taken for the purpose of frightening away animals from the location where the lawful activity is taking place.

(2) Placing or maintaining signs, gates, locks, or barricades that prohibit or deny access to lands without authorization from the landowner or lessee or an authorized designee of the landowner or lessee.

(3) Placing food on lands not belonging to the person placing the food for purposes of eliminating the lawful ability to hunt due to the presence of bait, as defined in this code or regulations adopted pursuant to this code.

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FGC § 2011.5 (California dog hunting regulations)

Taking and Possessing in General

(a) It is unlawful for a person to remove from a hunting dog any collar, including an electronic or radio transmitting device, without possessing written permission from the dog’s owner allowing the removal of the collar.

(b) As used in this section, “hunting dog” means a dog in the field actively engaged in the taking of mammals or birds, or a dog actively being trained for the taking of mammals or birds, that is located in an area where mammals or birds can be taken, at that time and place, in accordance with existing law.

(c) This section does not apply to a law enforcement officer or an animal control officer in the performance of his or her duty, or to a person who is assisting an injured dog.

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FGC § 3008 (California dog hunting regulations)

Methods of Taking

The physical control of a dog by its owner while the dog is engaged in hunting in an area where the owner is otherwise authorized to hunt, shall be as required by this code or regulations made pursuant thereto.

Dogs which are used for hunting which have been vaccinated for rabies in their county of residence in conformity with state law regulating vaccinations in rabies areas are not subject to rabies vaccination requirements of local ordinances outside their county of residence.

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FGC § 3032 (California dog hunting regulations)

Hunting Licenses

(a) As used in this section:

(1) “Bear” and “pursue” have the same meanings as defined in Section 3960.

(2) “Hound” means a dog used to pursue mammals.

(b) The commission may establish a hound tag program.

(c) If a hound tag program is established, the commission may require all of the following:

(1) That each hound be issued a license tag bearing a unique identifying number that is to be worn at all times by the hound while pursuing mammals.

(2) That all relevant local and state laws pertaining to dogs are being followed while the hound is being used to pursue mammals.

(3) That each hound be microchipped with an implanted transponder that has a unique identification code.

(4) That the owner maintain documentation showing that the hound is current on all required vaccinations and treatments for the prevention of rabies and any other disease specified by the department.

(5) That the owner report, within 24 hours of its last sighting, any hound that is lost during hunting, pursuing, or tracking activities.

(6) That the hound’s tag identification number be recorded on the hunting tag of any animal taken using the services of the hound.

(d) If a hound tag program is established, the commission may adjust the amount of the fees for the hound tag as necessary, to fully recover, but not exceed, all reasonable administrative and implementation costs of the department and the commission relating to the program.

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FGC § 3307 (California dog hunting regulations)

Licensed Domesticated Migratory Game Bird Shooting Areas

California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for domesticate migratory game birds.
California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for domesticate migratory game birds.

All birds killed or injured by shooters shall be retrieved without delay, and all injured birds shall be humanely dispatched. The licensee shall not permit injured birds to remain on a pond or feeding area, nor shall he knowingly permit such birds to be used in any subsequent release.

In order to prevent the loss of any dead or injured birds, the licensee shall provide the use of a retrieving dog, without cost, to all shooters, except that shooters may provide their own retrieving dogs. The licensee shall not permit the shooting of any birds unless a retrieving dog is immediately available for use by all shooters.

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FGC § 3502 (California dog hunting regulations)

General Provisions

It is unlawful to use any mammal (except a dog) or an imitation of a mammal as a blind in approaching or taking game birds.

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FGC § 3508 (California dog hunting regulations)

General Provisions

It is unlawful to break, train, hold field trials with, or practice dogs on any wild game bird or domesticated game bird during the closed season on that bird except as authorized by the commission.

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FGC § 3960 (California Dog Hunting Regulations)

Game Mammals

(a) As used in this section:

(1) “Pursue” means pursue, run, or chase.

(2) “Bear” means any black bear (Ursus americanus) found in the wild in this state.

California dog hunting regulations against pursuing bears with dogs.
California dog hunting regulations against pursuing bears with dogs.

(b) It is unlawful to permit or allow any dog to pursue any big game mammal during the closed season on that mammal, to pursue any fully protected, rare, or endangered mammal at any time, to pursue any bear or bobcat at any time, or to pursue any mammal in a game refuge or ecological reserve if hunting within that refuge or ecological reserve is unlawful.

(c) (1) The department may take any of the following actions:

(A) Capture any dog not under the reasonable control of its owner or handler, when that uncontrolled dog is pursuing, in violation of this section, any big game mammal, any bear or bobcat, or any fully protected, rare, or endangered mammal.

(B) Capture or dispatch any dog inflicting injury or immediately threatening to inflict injury to any big game mammal during the closed season on that mammal, and the department may capture or dispatch any dog inflicting injury or immediately threatening to inflict injury on any bear or bobcat at any time, or any fully protected, rare, or endangered mammal at any time.

(C) Capture or dispatch any dog inflicting injury or immediately threatening to inflict injury to any mammal in a game refuge or ecological reserve if hunting within that refuge or ecological reserve is unlawful.

(2) No criminal or civil liability shall accrue to any department employee as a result of enforcement of this section.

(3) This section does not apply to the use of dogs to pursue bears or bobcats by federal, state, or local law enforcement officers, or their agents or employees, when carrying out official duties as required by law.

(4) Owners of dogs with identification, that have been captured or dispatched, shall be notified within 72 hours after capture or dispatch.

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FGC § 3960.6 (California dog hunting regulations)

Game Mammals

(a) As used in this section, the terms “bear” and “pursue” have the same meanings as defined in Section 3960.

(b) Notwithstanding Section 3960, the pursuit of bears or bobcats by dogs that are guarding or protecting livestock or crops on property owned, leased, or rented by the owner of the dogs, is not prohibited if the dogs are maintained with, and remain in reasonable proximity to, the livestock or crops being guarded or protected.

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FGC § 3961 (California dog hunting regulations)

Game Mammals

California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for deer.
California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for deer.

Whenever an employee of the department is not present to carry out the provisions of Section 3960 with respect to any dog inflicting injury or immediately threatening to inflict injury to any deer, elk, or prong-horned antelope during the closed season for these mammals, any property owner, lessee, person holding a permit for the purpose of grazing livestock, or his or her employee, may seize or dispatch the dog if it is found on his or her land or premises without the permission of the person who is in immediate possession of the land. If the dog has on it any readily visible identification tag or license tag as prescribed by Section 30951 of the Food and Agricultural Code, and the dog is found in the act of immediately threatening to injure deer, elk, or prong-horned antelope, the dog may only be dispatched under this section if the dog has, and the owner has been notified that the dog has, previously threatened any of these species.

No action, civil or criminal, shall be maintained for a dog lawfully seized or dispatched pursuant to this article.

The owner of a dog shall be notified within 72 hours of the seizure or dispatching of that dog under this section if it had the identification tag or license tag which is required pursuant to Section 30951 of the Food and Agricultural Code.

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FGC § 4002 (California dog hunting regulations)

Trapping Provisions

California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for furbearing mammals.
California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for furbearing mammals.

Fur-bearing mammals may be taken only with a trap, a firearm, bow and arrow, poison under a proper permit, or with the use of dogs.

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FGC § 12000 (California dog hunting regulations)

General Provisions

(a) Except as expressly provided otherwise in this code, any violation of this code, or of any rule, regulation, or order made or adopted under this code, is a misdemeanor.

(b) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), a person who violates any of the following statutes or regulations is guilty of an infraction punishable by a fine of not less than one hundred dollars ($100) and not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000), or of a misdemeanor:

(1) Section 2009.

***

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California Dog Hunting Regulations from Title 14, Code of Regulations

Here, we fetch up major sections of California dog hunting regulations from the Code of Regulations (14 CCR § ).

14 CCR § 265 (California dog hunting regulations)

Use of Dogs for Pursuit/Take of Mammals or for Dog Training.

(a) Prohibitions on the Use of dogs.

The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training is prohibited as follows:

(1) The use of dogs is prohibited during the archery seasons for deer or bear.

California dog hunting regulations against pursuing bighorn sheep with dogs.
California dog hunting regulations against pursuing bighorn sheep with dogs.

(2) The use of dogs is prohibited for the take of bear, bobcat, elk, bighorn sheep and antelope.

(3) Mountain lions may not be pursued with dogs except under the provisions of a depredation permit issued pursuant to Section 4803 of the Fish and Game Code. Bear or bobcat may not be pursued with dogs except under the provisions of a permit issued pursuant to Sections 3960.2 or 3960.4 of the Fish and Game Code. Dog training on mountain lions is prohibited.

(4) The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training is prohibited from the first Saturday in April through the day preceding the opening of the general deer season in the following dog control zones:

(A) Central California Dog Control Zone:

Napa County north of Highway 128 and east of Highway 29; Lake County east of a line beginning at the Lake-Napa county line and Highway 29; northwest on Highway 29 to Highway 53. From Highway 53 turn northwest on Highway 20; northwest on Highway 20 to the Lake-Mendocino county line; north on the Lake-Mendocino county line to the Lake-Glenn county line; south on Lake-Glenn county line to the Lake-Colusa county line; south on the Lake-Colusa county line to the Lake-Yolo county line; southwest on the Lake-Yolo county line to the Lake-Napa county line; west on the Lake-Napa county line to the starting point. Mendocino County east of Highway 101, and north of Highway 20. Sierra and Alpine counties and those portions of Nevada, Placer, Amador and Calaveras counties east of Highway 49; and El Dorado County east of the following line: Beginning at the junction of Highway 49 and the Placer-El Dorado county line; south on Highway 49 to Highway 193 at Cool; east and south along Highway 193 to Highway 49 in Placerville; south on Highway 49 to the Amador-El Dorado county line; east on the El Dorado-Amador county line to the Alpine-El Dorado county line; east on the Alpine-El Dorado county line to the California-Nevada state line; north on the California-Nevada state line to the Placer-El Dorado county line; west on the Placer-El Dorado county line to the starting point.

(B) Northern California Dog Control Zone:

Plumas and Trinity counties. Butte County east of the following line: Beginning at the junction of Highway 99 and the Butte-Tehama county line; south and east along Highway 99 to Highway 149; south and east along Highway 149 to Highway 70; south along Highway 70 to the Butte-Yuba county line; east on the Butte-Yuba county line to the Butte-Plumas county line; north on the Butte-Plumas county line to the Butte-Tehama county line southwest on the Butte-Tehama county line to the starting point. Del Norte County east of Highway 101. Glenn County west of a line beginning at the intersection of County Road 200 and the Glenn-Tehama county line; southeast on County Road 200 to County Road 306; south along County Road 306 to the Colusa-Glenn county line; west on the Colusa-Glenn county line to the Glenn-Lake county line; northwest on the Glenn-Lake county line to the Glenn-Mendocino county line; north on the Glenn-Mendocino county line to the Glenn-Tehama county line; east on the Glenn-Tehama county line to the starting point. Humboldt County north of Highway 36 and east of Highway 101. Siskiyou County south and west of the line defined as follows: Beginning at the Oregon-California state line at Interstate 5, proceed south on Interstate 5 to Highway 97 at the town of Weed; north on Highway 97 to Meiss Lake Road near the town of Macdoel; east on Meiss Lake Road to Old State Highway; south on Old State Highway to Redrock Road; east on the Redrock Road (forest service road 15[8Q03] to Willow Creek Red Rock Road; north on Willow Creek Red Rock Road to the Gold Digger Pass Road (N8U01); east on the Gold Digger Pass Road to the western boundary of the Lava Beds National Monument; north and east on said boundary to the Siskiyou-Modoc county line; south on the Siskiyou-Modoc county line to the Siskiyou-Shasta county line; west on the Siskiyou-Shasta county line to the Siskiyou-Trinity county line; west on the Siskiyou-Trinity county line to the Siskiyou-Humboldt county line; northwest on the Siskiyou-Humboldt county line to the Siskiyou-Del Norte county line; north on the Siskiyou-Del Norte county line to the California-Oregon state line; east on the California-Oregon state line to the starting point. Shasta County south and west of Highway 89 and north of the line defined as follows: Beginning at the Shasta-Tehama county line and Highway 36 near the town of Beegum, go west on Highway 36 to County Road A16; north on County Road A16 to Pine Street in the city of Redding; north on Pine Street to Eureka Way (Highway 299); west on Eureka Way (Highway 299) to Highway 273; north on Highway 273 to Interstate 5; north on Interstate 5 to the south shore of Shasta Lake; east and north along the southern shore of Shasta Lake to Fender’s Ferry Road; southeast on Fender’s Ferry Road to Highway 299; southwest on Highway 299 to Oakrun Road; southwest on the Oakrun Road to Fern Road in the town of Oakrun; northeast on the Oakrun Road to Fern Road to the town of Fern; south and west on Fern Road to Whitmore Road; east on Whitmore Road to the town of Whitmore. From Whitmore Road turn south on Ponderosa Way to Innwood Road; Innwood Road to Highway 44 near Innwood; east on Highway 44 to Wilson Hill Road; south on Wilson Hill Road to Rock Creek Road; south on Rock Creek Road to the Shasta-Tehama county line; east along the Shasta-Tehama county line to Highway 89; North on Highway 89 to the Shasta-Siskiyou county line; west along the Shasta-Siskiyou county line to the Shasta-Trinity county line; southeast along the Shasta-Trinity county line to the Shasta-Tehama county line; east along the Shasta-Tehama county line to the starting point. The following portions of Tehama County: Those portions of Tehama County within the Mendocino National Forest and east of Ponderosa Way. Those portions of Tehama County within the Lassen National Forest.Those portions of Tehama County east of Ponderosa Way. Those portions of Lassen County north and west of the following line: North from the Lassen-Sierra county line on Highway 395 to Highway 36 east of Susanville; northwest on Highway 36 to Highway 139; north on Highway 139 to the Lassen-Modoc county line; west along the Lassen-Modoc county line to the Lassen-Shasta county line; south along the Lassen-Shasta county line to the Plumas-Lassen county line; southeast along the Plumas-Lassen county line to the Lassen-Sierra county line; east along the Lassen-Sierra county line to the starting point.

(C) Southern Sierra Dog Control Zone:

Those portions of Tuolumne, Mariposa, Madera, Fresno and Tulare counties east of the following line beginning at the intersection of Highway 49 and the Calaveras-Tuolumne county line; south on Highway 49 to Highway 108; southwest on Highway 108 to Highway 120; east on Highway 120 to the Smith Station Road (J20); south on the Smith Station Road (J20) to the Greeley Hill Road; east on the Greeley Hill Road to the Briceburg Road; east on Briceburg Road to the North Fork of the Merced River at Bower Cave; south on the North Fork of the Merced River to Road 3S15 (Black Mountain Road/Ponderosa Way); south on Road 3S15 (Ponderosa Way) to Forest Service Road 3S02 (Ponderosa Way) crossing the U.S. Forest Service-Bureau of Land Management property boundary in Section 28 located in Township 3S, Range 18E to Forest Service Road 2S05 (Bull Creek Road); south on Forest Service Road 2S05 (Bull Creek Road) to the Main Fork of the Merced River; west on the Main Fork of the Merced River to the southern boundary of Lake McClure; west on the southern boundary of Lake McClure to Highway 49; south on Highway 49 to Highway 140 at Mariposa; north on Highway 140 to the South Fork of the Merced River;east along the South Fork of the Merced River to Hite Cove Trail at Hite Cove. From Hite Cove south on the U.S. Forest Service Road (Hite Cove Trail) to Hite Cove Road; south on Hite Cove Road to Scott Road; south on Scott Road to Jerseydale Road; south on Jerseydale Road through Jerseydale Station and Darrah to the Darrah Road; south along Darrah Road to Highway 49; south along Highway 49 to Highway 41 at Oakhurst; north along Highway 41 to its intersection with the Bass Lake Road at Yosemite Forks; south along Bass Lake Road to Road 274; south on Road 274 past Bass Lake on the east side of the lake to the junction with the Mammoth Pool Road at North Fork; west on Mammoth Pool Road to Road 222 (Auberry Road); south on Road 222 (Auberry Road) to the San Joaquin River; east along the San Joaquin River to Italian Bar Road (Road 225) at the Italian Bar Bridge; south on Italian Bar Road (Road 225) to Jose Basin Road (County Road M2441); east on Jose Basin Road (County Road M2441) to its intersection with Forestry Service Roads 8S08 (Railroad Grade Road) and 9S07 (Jose Basin Road); south on 9S07 (Jose Basin Road) to Jose Basin/Musick Farm Road; southeast on 9S07 to Auberry Road near Pine Ridge; east on Auberry Road to North Toll House Road; south on North Toll House Road to Peterson Road; east on Peterson Road to Big Creek Road; east on Big Creek Road (10S02) near Peterson Mill to Dinkey-Trimmer Road (10S69 Trimmer Springs Road) at Haslett Basin; east on Dinkey-Trimmer Road (10S69) to Sycamore Springs Road (11S02); east on Sycamore Springs Road (11S02) to Black Rock Road (11S12) at Balch Camp; east on the Black Rock Road (11S12) to the decommissioned 11S07 (the old Rodgers Ridge Road) at Black Rock Reservoir Dam; east along decommissioned 11S07 (old Rodgers Ridge Road) to Garlic Spur; south on Garlic Spur to the Kings River; west along the Kings River to Verplank Ridge; south on Verplank Ridge-Hoise Ridge to Forest Route 13S65; southeast on Forest Route 13S65 to Forest Route 13S03; southeast on Forest Route 13S03 to Highway 180 near Cherry Gap; south along Highway 180 to the north boundary of Kings Canyon/Sequoia National Park; south along the western boundary of Kings Canyon/Sequoia National Park to the northern boundary of Sequoia National Forest between Grouse Peak and Dennison Mountain; south along the common line between R29E and R30E, M.D.B.M. to the boundary of the Sequoia National Forest; east and south along that boundary to Balch Park Road; southeast along that road to the west boundary of Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest; south and east along that boundary to Forest Trail 30E14; southeast along 30E14 to the Doyle Springs Road (Wishon Drive); southwest along Doyle Springs Road (Wishon Drive) to Camp Wishon; southeast along the Alder Creek Grove-Hossack Meadow Road to Camp Nelson; east along Highway 190 to Coy Flat Road; south along Coy Flat Road to the boundary of the Tule River Indian Reservation; south along the east boundary of that reservation (County Highway J42) to Parker Peak; southeast through Upper Parker Meadow to Parker Pass. Parker Pass to Forest Route 22S81; south through Starvation Creek Grove on Forest Route 22S81 to M504 (Parker Pass); south on M504 to Forest Route 23S64; southeast on 23S64 to the southwest corner of Section 15, T23S, R31E, M.D.B.M, continuing to the northeast corner of Section 22, T23S, R31E, M.D.B.M.; south approximately 6 miles to Sugarloaf Winter Recreation Area.; southeast on Sugarloaf drive to Forest Road 24S23; northeast on Forest Route 24S23 to Forest Route 23S16; Southeast on Forest Route 23S16 to Portuguese Pass; southeast along Forest Route 23S16 (24S06) though Portuguese Pass to the Tulare-Kern county line; east along the Tulare-Kern county line to the Tulare-Inyo county line.; north along the Tulare-Inyo county line to Fresno-Inyo county line; north along the Fresno-Inyo county line to the Fresno-Mono county line; north along the Fresno-Mono County line to the Mono-Madera county line; north along the Mono-Madera county line to the Mono-Tuolumne county line; north along the Mono-Tuolumne county line to the Alpine-Tuolumne county line; northwest along the Alpine-Tuolumne county line to the Calaveras-Tuolumne county line; southwest along the Calaveras-Tuolumne county line to the starting point. That portion of Kern County within a line beginning where the Tulare-Kern county line intersects the west boundary of the Sequoia National Forest; south along the said boundary to the Poso Flat Road; on Poso Flat Road to National Forest Route 25S03 (Rancheria Road); northeast along National Forest 25S03 (Rancheria Road) to National Forest 25S15 (Rancheria Road); north on National Forest 25S15 (Rancheria Road) to Rancheria Road; northeast along Rancheria Road through Shirley Meadow to Forest Highway 90 (Forest Route 23S16) at Greenhorn Summit; northeast on Forest Highway 90 (Forest Route 23S16) to Cow Creek; northeast on Cow Creek to Bull Run Creek; north on Bull Run Creek to the Tulare-Kern county line; west along said county line to the point of beginning, Those portions of Inyo and Mono counties west of Highway 395.

(D) Southern California Dog Control Zone:

Those portions of Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties within the Los Padres and Angeles National Forests; and those portions of San Bernardino County within the San Bernardino and Angeles National Forests.

(b) Authorized Use of Dogs.

The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training is authorized as follows:

(1) Dog Control Zones.

The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training is permitted in the dog control zones described in subsections 265(a)(4)(A), (B), (C) and (D) from the opening day of the general deer season through the first Friday in April.

(2) Areas of the State Outside the Dog Control Zones.

The use of dogs for the pursuit/take of mammals or for dog training in areas outside of the dog control zones is permitted year-round, except for closures and restrictions described in this Section 265 and Section 364, and the provisions of Sections 3960 and 4800 of the Fish and Game Code which prohibit allowing any dog to pursue any big game mammal during the closed season on such mammal or mountain lions, elk or any fully-protected, threatened or endangered mammal at any time.

(3) Take of Depredating Mammals.

The use of dogs is permitted for pursuing/taking depredating mammals by federal and county animal damage control officers or by permittees authorized under a depredation permit issued by the department.

(4) Take of Furbearers and Nongame Mammals.

California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for nongame mammals, like coyote.
California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for nongame mammals.

Furbearers and nongame mammals as specified in subsection 472(a) may be taken with the aid of dogs during the appropriate open season, except for closures and restrictions described in subsections 265(a) and (b).

(5) Prohibition on Starting Pursuit Within 400 Yards of Baited Area.

Pursuits may not be started within 400 yards of a baited area as described in Section 257.5 of these regulations.

(6) Dog Training.

Except for the prohibitions of subsection 265(a), dog training is permitted pursuant to the following provisions:

(A) Dog Training Defined.
California dog hunting regulations for training in dog control zones.
California dog hunting regulations for training in dog control zones.

For purposes of these regulations, dog training is defined as the education of dogs through “breaking” or “practicing” under strict provisions that preclude the injuring or take of animals. Training is distinguished from “pursuit”, as used in Section 86 of the Fish and Game Code, in that the animal being chased shall not be killed, captured, or injured.

(B) Prohibition on Killing, Capturing or Injuring Mammals.

No person shall kill, capture or injure any mammal, nor shall any person’s dog be allowed to kill, capture or injure any mammal during dog training.

(C) Prohibition on Possession of Equipment.
California dog hunting regulations against weapons while training.
California dog hunting regulations against weapons while training.

No firearm, archery gear, crossbow or other instrument capable of killing, injuring or capturing any animal may be possessed by any person training dogs during the seasons described in subsection 265(b)(6)(F) below. Possession of a firearm, archery gear, crossbow or other instrument capable of killing or capturing any animal is prohibited while training dogs, but such equipment may be transported to or from a campsite, transported to or from a residence or lawfully possessed by a person at a campsite provided all dogs are secured and under the control of the owner, agent or person training or transporting said dogs.

(D) Prohibition on Starting Dog Training Within 400 Yards of Baited Area.

Dog Training may not be started within 400 yards of a baited area as described in Section 257.5 of these regulations.

(E) Prohibition on Training Dogs on Big Game Mammals, Bobcat or on Protected, Threatened or Endangered Mammals.
California dog hunting regulations against training on mammals, including bobcat.
California dog hunting regulations against training on mammals.

It shall be unlawful to train any dog on any big game mammal, bobcat, or to train any dog on any fully-protected, threatened or endangered mammal at any time. A person in possession of a valid deer tag may utilize the general deer season for purposes of educating a dog for deer. Only one dog may be used for training in areas where the general deer season (as described in subsection 360(a) and (b)) is open.

(F) Seasons.
1. Gray Fox.
California furbearing mammal regulations for California gray fox hunting seasons, and California gray fox trapping.
California dog hunting regulations for the gray fox dog training season.

Dogs may be trained on gray fox from March 1 through the day preceding the opening of the general gray fox season, except for closures and restrictions described in subsections 265(a) and (b).

2. Raccoon.
California dog hunting regulations for the raccoon dog training season.
California dog hunting regulations for the raccoon dog training season.

Dogs may be trained on raccoon from April 1 through the day preceding the opening of the general raccoon season, except for closures and restrictions described in subsections 265(a) and (b).

3. Other Mammals.

Except for closures and prohibitions described in this Sections 265 and sections 3960 and 4800 of the Fish and Game Code, dogs may be trained on mammals other than gray fox and raccoon at any time.

(c) Restrictions on the Number of Dogs per Hunter.

(1) One Dog per Hunter Limitation During Deer Season.

No more than one dog per hunter may be used in the area where the general deer season is open.

(2) Three Dogs per Hunter Limitation for the Take of Wild Pigs.

California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for pigs.
California dog hunting regulations for dog hunting for pigs.

Up to three dogs per hunter may be used for the purpose of taking wild pigs, pursuant to the following provisions:

(A) No more than one dog per hunter may be used in an area where the general deer season is open.

(B) No dogs may be used within the closures described in subsection 265(a).

(d) Prohibition on Treeing Switches and Use of Global Positioning System Equipment.

(1) Treeing Switches.

Electronic dog retrieval collars containing functioning treeing switches (devices consisting of a switch mechanism that results in a change in the transmitted signals when the dog raises its head to a treed animal) are prohibited on dogs used for the pursuit/take of mammals.

(2) Global Positioning System Equipment.

Electronic dog retrieval collars employing the use of global positioning system equipment (devices that utilize satellite transmissions) are prohibited on dogs used for the pursuit/take of mammals.

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14 CCR Section 551(i) (California Dog Hunting Regulations)

Wildlife Areas Authorized for Dog Training and/or Dog Trials:

California dog hunting regulations for training and trials at Wildlife Areas.
California dog hunting regulations for training and trials at Wildlife Areas.

Dog training and/or dog trials are authorized as specified below. Dog trials require a Special Use Permit. Site-specific dog training and/or trial prohibitions are identified in subsection 551(o). General rules regarding the use of dogs for hunting, training or trials are located in subsection 550(n) of these regulations.

    1. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed with written authorization from the area manager.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed.
    2. Grizzly Island Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed on the area but prohibited from March 1 through June 30, August 1 through the end of the tule elk season in September, and October 1 through the end of waterfowl season.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed on the area but prohibited from March 1 through June 30, August 1 through the end of the tule elk season in September, and October 1 through the end of waterfowl season.
    3. Hollenbeck Canyon Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from September 1 through February. Only male ring-necked pheasants, male bobwhite quail, either sex feral pigeons, and male mallard ducks may be used for dog training purposes. Release or possession of female ring-necked pheasant, female bobwhite quail, female mallard, or any other bird species is It is unlawful to release or possess a male mallard duck without at least one wing clipped.
      • Dog Trials: Not authorized.
    4. Imperial Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed with written authorization from the area manager.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed only in designated areas on the Finney-Ramer Unit.
    5. Little Panoche Reservoir Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Prohibited.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed.
    6. Los Banos Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from the end of waterfowl season to March 31 and July 1 through September 15.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from the end of waterfowl season to March 31 and July 1 through September 15.
    7. Mendota Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Dog Training: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from the end of waterfowl season to March 31.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed.
    8. North Grasslands Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from the end of waterfowl season to March 31 and July 1 through September 15.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed on the area but prohibited from April 1 through June 30 and September 15 through the end of waterfowl season.
    9. O’Neil Forebay Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed.
    10. Oroville Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from July 1 through March 15.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from July 1 through March 15.
    11. San Felipe Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from September 1 through the end of
      • Dog Trials: Not authorized.
    12. San Jacinto Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed only on the Davis Road Unit and requires written authorization from the area
      • Dog Trials: Allowed only on the Davis Road Unit.
    13. Spenceville Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from July 1 through March 15.
      • Dog Trials: Allowed only in the designated portion of the area from July 1 through March 15.
    14. Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area
      • Dog Training: Allowed with written authorization from the area manager.
      • Dog Trials: Not authorized.

14 CCR § 677 (California dog hunting regulations)

Dog Training and Field Trials

(a) Dog Training When No Wild Birds Are Captured, Injured, or Killed.

Notwithstanding Sections 265 of these regulations, a person may train dogs to retrieve, or to point or flush game birds, or may train for or participate in field trails or similar events related to these activities, at any time of year from sunrise to sunset if no wild birds are captured, injured, or killed. Domestically reared birds may be released and taken for dog training or field trials only as provided in Section 677(b). Dogs shall not be trained on or otherwise be allowed to pursue any birds that have special protection under California or federal law, including but not limited to fully protected birds (Section 3511 of the Fish and Game Code) and endangered, threatened or candidate species (Section 670.5 of these regulations and Code of Federal Regulations, Title 50, Section 17.11).

(b) Release and Take of Birds.

California dog hunting regulations for domestically reared game birds, including ducks.
California dog hunting regulations for domestically reared game birds.

Notwithstanding Section 671.6 of these regulations, bobwhite and coturnix quail, domestic pigeons, and the following domestically reared game birds may be released and/or taken during dog training or organizational field trials in accordance with subsections (b)(1) through (b)(5) of this section, general resident game bird regulations, or licensed game bird club regulations: pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), including all ring-necked pheasant races, chukar, Hungarian partridge and captive-reared mallard ducks.

(1) Hunting License Required.

Each person taking domestically reared game birds must possess a valid California hunting license. In addition, each person, except holders of junior hunting licenses, taking Hungarian partridge, ring-necked pheasant, and chukar must possess a valid Upland Game Bird Stamp.

(2) Prior Notification Required.

Persons releasing and/or taking game birds in accordance with this section during organized field trials or hunt tests shall provide the Department’s regional office in the region where the birds will be released and/or taken the following information at least three business days prior to the activity. This notification shall be in letter form, by fax, or by internet. The information required includes:

(A) The name, address, and telephone number of the person providing the information.

(B) The location that birds will be released and/or taken.

(C) The approximate number of each species of bird that will be released and/or taken.

(D) The approximate number of persons who will be involved in the release and/or take.

(E) The date and time that birds will be released and/or taken.

For any event where more than one person may be taking birds, only a single notification is required.

(3) Restrictions On Daily Take.

(A) Domestically reared game birds may be taken only on the day they are released, except when taken pursuant to general resident game bird regulations.

(B) Bobwhite quail and coturnix quail released for dog training or field trial purposes may be taken on any day.

(4) Marking of Birds.

(A) Prior to Release.

If the Department determines that there is a need to distinguish domestically reared game birds used for dog training or field trials from other game birds at a particular location or event, the Regional Manager may require that some or all species of domestically reared game birds used for dog training or field trials be marked with streamers, coloring, or other conspicuous material prior to their release.

(B) Carcass.

The carcass of each pheasant and chukar shall be tagged with a seal as provided by Section 3206 of the Fish and Game Code. The carcasses of bobwhite quail and coturnix quail need not be tagged. While in the field, all birds must be in a condition that the species can be identified.

(5) Inspection of Birds.

The department may inspect all birds prior to their release and no birds may be released if the department determines that such releases may have significant potential to transmit diseases to wild bird populations.

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14 CCR § 1423 (California dog hunting regulations)

Animal Waste (State Forests)

Persons keeping dogs, cats or other animals within designated camping areas are responsible for removing and burying any and all droppings of said animal, and failure to do so within a reasonable time, or upon order of a state forest officer, shall constitute a violation of this Section.

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14 CCR § 1424 (California dog hunting regulations)

Pets (State Forests)

(a) No person shall bring a dog, cat or other animal into a designated camping area unless it is confined, or in a vehicle, or upon a leash not longer than 6 feet (1.83 m), or otherwise under physical restrictive control at all times.

(b) No person shall keep within a state forest a dog or other animal which is noisy, vicious, dangerous or disturbing to other persons after having been ordered by a state forest officer to remove said animal from the state forest.

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14 CCR § 4312 (California dog hunting regulations)

Control of Animals (State Parks & Recreation Areas)

(a) No person shall permit a dog to run loose, or turn loose any animal in any portion of a unit, except upon written authorization by the District Superintendent.

(b) No person shall keep an animal in any unit except under his/her immediate control.

(c) No person shall keep a noisy, vicious, or dangerous dog or animal or one which is disturbing to other persons, in any unit and remain therein after he/she has been asked by a peace officer to leave.

(d) No person shall permit a dog or a cat to remain outside a tent, camper, or enclosed vehicle during the night.

(e) No person shall bring a dog into, permit a dog to enter or remain, or possess a dog in units under control of Department of Parks and Recreation unless the dog is on leash of no more than six feet in length and under the immediate control of a person or confined in a vehicle.

(f) No person shall bring a dog into, permit a dog to enter or remain, or possess a dog:

1) beyond the limits of campgrounds, picnic areas, parking areas, roads, structures or in posted portions of units except as provided elsewhere in this section.

2) on any beach adjacent to any body of water in any unit except in portions of units designated for dogs.

(g) In state recreation areas open to hunting pursuant to Public Resources Code, Section 5003.1, dogs may be used to assist in hunting. Such dogs shall not be permitted to pursue or take any wildlife other than that being hunted.

(h) Subsections e) and f) shall not apply to trained “seeing eye,” “signal,” or “service” dogs used to guide a physically impaired person there present, or dogs that are being trained to become “seeing eye,” “signal,” or “service” dogs.

(g) Grazing. No person shall graze, herd or permit livestock to enter or remain inside a unit without specific written authorization of the Department, except for grazing by animals used for riding or packing under direct control of visitors or concessionaires.

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While we try to fetch up all California dog hunting regulations, we might miss a few or make a typo. If so, please leave a comment or question in the reply box below.

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