190 Places for California Deer Hunting Public Land (BLM, Forests, Parks, Military Bases, Wildlife Areas, Refuges, and Reserves)

California deer hunting on public land.

Here, we fetch up 190 great opportunities for California deer hunting public land, plus private land. We make it really simple. First of all, we organize them by regions of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). Second, we separate them by the type of land. For example, we locate areas managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). In addition, we locate areas managed by the CDFW. They include National Wildlife Refuges, State Wildlife Areas, and Ecological Reserves. Finally, we find other spots to hunt deer, including forests, recreation areas, lakes, and military bases.

In addition to these public hunting opportunities, you can find private hunts on our summaries for hunting clubs. Also see private hunts coordinated by the CDFW. They offer hunting through its SHARE Program, Private Land Management Program (“PLM”), and Fundraising Hunts. For more info about deer hunting, go to California Deer Hunting Seasons.


Region 1 of the CDFW.

Northern California Deer Hunting Areas.

California deer hunting public land in CDFW Region 1First of all, you’ll find California deer hunting public land in Region 1 of the CDFW. First of all, we identify land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Some of it’s just called “land,” while others are called Wilderness, Conservation Areas, Management Areas, and “Planning Units.” In addition, we list State Wildlife Areas with hunting programs managed by the CDFW. Finally, there are national and state forests, as well as parks.

BLM Land.

  1. Alturas, BLM lands near Alturas.
  2. Cahto Peak Unit of the South Fork Eel River Wilderness.
  3. Cinder Cone Planning Unit.
  4. Hayden Hill Planning Unit.
  5. King Range National Conservation Area.
  6. Lacks Creek Management Area.
  7. Madeline Planning Unit.
  8. Paynes Creek Wetlands, which is located at the Sacramento River Bend Outstanding Nature Area.
  9. Red Mountain Unit of the South Fork Eel River Wilderness.
  10. Sacramento River Bend (see Paynes Creek above).
  11. Sacramento River Management Area.
  12. Shasta Management Area.
  13. Surprise Valley Field Office.
  14. Susanville, northeast of Susanville.
  15. Trinity Management Area at Tunnel Ridge and North of Trinity River.

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Wildlife Areas.

  1. Bass Hill Wildlife Area, and is in Lassen county.
  2. Biscar Wildlife Area, and is in Lassen county.
  3. Cantara Wildlife Area in Siskiyou county, and is a “Type C” area.
  4. Doyle Wildlife Area in Lassen county, and is a “Type C” area.
  5. Fitzhugh Creek Wildlife Area.
  6. Horseshoe Ranch Wildlife Area.
  7. Mouth of Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area, and is in Shasta and Tehama counties.
  8. Ney Springs Wildlife Area, and is in Siskiyou county.
  9. Pine Creek Wildlife Area.
  10. Silver Creek Wildlife Area.
  11. Surprise Valley Wildlife Area.
  12. Tehama Wildlife Area.

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Forests and Parks.

  1. Jackson State Forest.
  2. Klamath National Forest.
  3. Lassen National Forest.
  4. Latour State Forest.
  5. Modoc National Forest.
  6. Shasta–Trinity National Forest.
  7. Six Rivers National Forest.
  8. Whiskeytown National Park.

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Region 2 of the CDFW.

Central Northern California Deer Hunting Areas.

California deer hunting public land in CDFW Region 2First of all, you’ll find California deer hunting public land in Region 2 of the CDFW. There’s public hunting on land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Some of it’s called “land,” and others are formally classified as Wilderness, Conservation Areas, Management Areas, Natural Areas, Recreation Areas, and “Planning Units.” In addition, there’s also National Wildlife Refuges, State Wildlife Areas, and Ecological Reserves__ with hunting programs managed by the CDFW. Finally, there are national and state forests, parks, and lakes.

BLM Land.

  1. Cache Creek Natural Area.
  2. Cow Mountain Recreation Area.
  3. Indian Valley/Walker Ridge Recreation Area.
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Wildlife Areas, Refuges, and Reserves.

  1. Antelope Valley Wildlife Area.
  2. Cache Creek Wildlife Area.
  3. Colusa Bypass Wildlife Area, and is in Colusa county.
  4. Coon Hollow Wildlife Area.
  5. Crocker Meadows Wildlife Area, and is in Plumas county.
  6. Daugherty Hill Wildlife Area.
  7. Feather River Wildlife Area, and is in Sutter and Yuba counties.
  8. Fremont Weir Wildlife Area, and is in Sutter and Yolo counties.
  9. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, but deer hunting is only allowed with a “G-12” tag from the Big Game drawing.
  10. Hallelujah Junction Wildlife Area.
  11. Heenan Lake Wildlife Area.
  12. Hope Valley Wildlife Area, but it’s closed to hunting from February 1 until the opening of archery deer season.
  13. Indian Valley Wildlife Area.
  14. North Table Mountain Reserve.
  15. Oroville Wildlife Area, and is in Butte county.
  16. Red Lake Wildlife Area, but it’s closed February 1 through August 31 except during archery deer season.
  17. Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge, but it’s only for black-tailed deer.
  18. Smithneck Creek Wildlife Area.
  19. Spenceville Wildlife Area (Zone D-3), , and is in Nevada and Yuba counties.
  20. Sutter Bypass Wildlife Area (Zone D-4), and is in Sutter county.
  21. Truckee River Wildlife Area, and is in Nevada and Placer counties.
  22. Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area, but it’s only allowed in the Little Dry Creek Unit, and requires a J-9 apprentice tag from the Big Game drawing.
  23. Warner Valley Wildlife Area.

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Forest, Parks, and Lakes.

  1. Black Butte Lake.
  2. Boggs Mountain State Forest.
  3. Eldorado National Forest.
  4. Englebright Lake.
  5. Mendocino National Forest.
  6. Plumas National Forest.
  7. Stanislaus National Forest.
  8. Tahoe National Forest.
  9. Toiyabe National Forest.

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Region 3 of the CDFW.

Bay Delta Northern California Deer Hunting Areas.

California deer hunting public land in CDFW Region 3First of all, you’ll find California deer hunting public land in Region 3 of the CDFW. In addition, there’s public hunting on land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Finally, there’s also State Wildlife Areas with hunting programs managed by the CDFW.

  1. Cedar Roughs Wildlife Area.
  2. Knoxville Recreation Area.
  3. Knoxville Wildlife Area.
  4. Laguna Mountain Recreation Area/Sweetwater Area.
  5. Lake Sonoma Wildlife Area, but only during special hunts authorized by the CDFW. Deer tags are required through the Big Game drawing. Warning shot!!! A permit may be required from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  6. Putah Creek Wildlife Area (Zone A), but is closed to hunting February 1 through the opening weekend of the Zone A deer archery season.
  7. Rector Reservoir Wildlife Area, but is closed to hunting from the day after spring turkey season closes through the opening of archery deer season.

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Region 4 of the CDFW.

Central California Deer Hunting Areas.

California deer hunting public land in CDFW Region 4First of all, you’ll find California deer hunting public land in Region 4 of the CDFW. There’s public hunting on land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Some of it’s called “land,” and others are formally classified as Wilderness, Management Areas, Natural Monuments, Recreation Areas, and “Planning Units.” In addition, there’s also State Wildlife Areas and Ecological Reserves__ with hunting programs managed by the CDFW. Finally, there are national and state forests and lakes. There’s even some hunting on military bases.

BLM Land.

  1. Carrizo Plain National Monument.
  2. Chimney Peak Wilderness.
  3. Clear Creek Management Area.
  4. Coalinga Mineral Springs National Recreation Trail.
  5. Curry Mountain Recreation Area.
  6. Domeland Addition Wilderness.
  7. Griswold Hills Recreation Area.
  8. Hunter Valley Mountain Recreation Area.
  9. Keysville/Isabella Lake Special Recreation Management Area.
  10. Kiavah Wildernes.
  11. New Melones Lake, Peoria Wildlife Area.
  12. Owens Peak Wilderness.
  13. Panoche Hills Recreation Area.
  14. Peoria Wildlife Area (see New Melones Lake above).
  15. Red Hills Area of Critical Environmental Concern.
  16. Sacatar Trail Wilderness.
  17. San Joaquin River Gorge Management Area.
  18. Sheep Ridge.
  19. South Fork American River.
  20. Stockdale Mountain.
  21. Temblor National Cooperative Land and Wildlife Management Area.
  22. Tuolomne Planning Unit.
  23. Walker-Monache Pass.

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Wildlife Areas and Reserves.

  1. Big Sandy Wildlife Area.
  2. Carrizo Plains Reserve.
  3. Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area, and it’s only available with a special draw entry permit during the opening weekend of the Zone A general deer season. Self-registration is required at all other times of year. In the Lower Cottonwood Creek Unit, only archery is allowed from the start of the archery season until the start of the general season. In the Upper Cottonwood Creek Unit, firearms are allowed, but only from the opening of the Zone A general deer season through the last Sunday in January. Only archery equipment is allowed from the start of the Zone A archery deer season until the start of the Zone A general deer season.
  4. Kinsman Flat Wildlife Area.
  5. Monache Meadows Wildlife Area.
  6. O’Neil Forebay Wildlife Area, and is in Merced county but only archery only.
  7. Panoche Hills Reserve.
  8. Pleasant Valley Reserve.
  9. San Luis Reservoir Wildlife Area (Zone A), but requires a special draw permit during opening weekend. At all other times of the year, self-registration is required at the parking lot on Dinosaur Point Road.

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Military Bases.

  1. Camp Roberts Military Base.
  2. Fort Hunter Liggett Military Base.

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Forests and Lakes.

  1. Eastman Lake
  2. Los Padres National Forest.
  3. Mountain Home State Forest.
  4. Sequoia National Forest.
  5. Sierra National Forest.
  6. Stanislaus National Forest.

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Region 5 of the CDFW.

Southern Coast California Deer Hunting Areas.

California deer hunting public land in CDFW Region 5First of all, you’ll find California deer hunting public land in Region 5 of the CDFW. There’s public hunting on land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Some of it’s called “land,” and others are formally classified as Wilderness and Management Areas. Second, there’s State Wildlife Areas and Ecological Reserves__ with hunting programs managed by the CDFW. Finally, there’s forests and military bases.

  1. Angeles National Forest.
  2. Camp Pendleton Military Base, which is a marine corps base.
  3. Cleveland National Forest.
  4. Coal Canyon Ecological Reserve.
  5. Jacumba National Cooperative Land and Wildlife Management Area.
  6. Los Padres National Forest.
  7. McAlmond Canyon/Hauser Mountain Area.
  8. McCain Valley Wildlife Management Area.
  9. Otay Mountain Ecological Reserve.
  10. Otay Mountain Wilderness.
  11. San Felipe Valley Wildlife Area, but D-16 tags are not allowed west of Highway S-2.
  12. Walker Canyon Reserve.

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Region 6 of the CDFW.

Inland Deserts Southern California Deer Hunting.

California deer hunting public land in CDFW Region 6In this Section, you’ll find California deer hunting public land in Region 6 of the CDFW. First of all, there’s public hunting on land managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Some of it’s called “land” or mountains, while others are formally classified as Field Offices, Wilderness, and Management Areas, Preserves. In addition, there’s National Wildlife Refuges, State Wildlife Areas and Ecological Reserves__ with hunting programs managed by the CDFW. Finally, there are forests and recreation areas.

BLM Land.

  1. Adobe Valley Area.
  2. Bishop Field Office BLM and is in the Inyo National Forest.
  3. Bodie Hills Management Area.
  4. Bridgeport Management Area.
  5. Chocolate Mountains, Southeast.
  6. Chuckwalla Mountains (see Jawbone Canyon below).
  7. Clark Range Area.
  8. Crater Mountain Area.
  9. Jawbone Canyon/Chuckwalla Mountains.
  10. Juniper Flats Management Area.
  11. Little Chuckwalla Mountains.
  12. Long Valley Management Area.
  13. Lower Colorado River Area.
  14. Mesquite Wilderness Area.
  15. Mojave Desert Preserve.
  16. Mono Lake Basin Area.
  17. Mule Mountains.
  18. North Algodones Dunes Wilderness.
  19. Orocopia Mountains Area.
  20. Owens Lake Management Area.
  21. Picacho Peak Area.
  22. Poppett Flat Area.
  23. San Bernardino Mountains.
  24. San Jacinto Mountains.
  25. Smuggler’s Cave Area.
  26. South Benton Area.
  27. West Owens Valley Area.
  28. West Panamint Mountains.
  29. West Slinkard Valley Management Area.
  30. Whitewater Canyon.

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Wildlife Refuges and Reserves.

  1. Buttermilk Country Wildlife Area.
  2. By-Day Creek Reserve.
  3. Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, and you’ll find mule deer.
  4. Crater Mountain Area.
  5. East Walker River Wildlife Area, and is in Mono county.
  6. Green Creek Wildlife Area.
  7. Imperial National Wildlife Refuge, and you’ll find mule deer.
  8. Imperial National Wildlife Refuge and you’ll find mule deer.
  9. Kelso Peak and Old Dad Mountains Wildlife Area.
  10. Old Dad Mountains and Kelso Peak Wildlife Area.
  11. Pickel Meadow Wildlife Area , which is a “Type C” area and is in Mono county. You’ll find mule deer.
  12. River Spring Lakes Reserve.
  13. Santa Rosa Wildlife Area.
  14. Slinkard-Little Antelope Wildlife Area.
  15. West Walker River Wildlife Area.

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Forests.

  1. Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest in the Bridgeport Ranger District.
  2. Inyo National Forest and the Bishop Field Office.
  3. San Bernardino National Forest.
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