8 Hunting Regulations for California Common Carriers of Wild Game Prior to Receipt or Shipment

California bobcat hunting seasons and California Bobcat Hunting Regulations

Here, we fetch up major regulations for California common carriers of wild game. We bring them back with hunter-friendly summaries and links to the regulations and our pages with related hunting laws.

Topics

  1. Bobcat Pelts
  2. Crows
  3. Domestic Animals
  4. Import Documents
  5. Inspections
  6. Marine Mammals
  7. Packages
  8. Violations

Bobcats

California common carriers of wild game, including bobcat pelts.
California common carriers of wild game, including bobcat pelts.

In general, a hunting license and hunting tag is required to hunt Bobcats. If a hunter kills a bobcat, the hunter has to affix the tag on the pelt. There’s a limited exception for landowners and tenants that kill a bobcat in order to protect people or property. There’s another exception for certain animal control agents. Also, see our page for Depredation Permits.

In general, it’s illegal for anyone to transport a bobcat, or any part of a bobcat, out of California (e.g. pelts, claws, and teeth). It’s even illegal to ask a common carrier to ship it out of the State. If it doesn’t have a valid hunting tag, no one can take possession of it for any reason with either a CDFW mark or shipping tag attached to the pelt or other part. This is true whether it’s for sale, export, or personal use. Warning shot!!! As of November 20, 2015, the CDFW stopped marking or putting tags on bobcat pelts.

To import a bobcat pelt, or receive it from outside of the State, it has to be marked with a current export or shipping tag from the State of origin. It also has to have an “import declaration” for raw pelts. It has to species the kind and quantity of pelts, the state where it was taken, the license number, and statement that it was taken legally. Upon request by the CDFW, you have to show them the “declaration of entry” and markings, and be able to prove that you own it, that it was taken legally. See 14 CCR § 478.1(d) and 14 CCR § 479(b).


American Crows

California common carriers of wild game, including American crows.
California common carriers of wild game, including American crows.

In general, a hunting license is required to hunt American Crows. If you use a common carrier to ship it somewhere, you have to maintain custody of it until delivering it to the common carrier. Otherwise, you have to maintain custody of it until getting it to your vehicle, lodge, post office, or Personal Place of Abode. See 14 CCR § 485(c).


Domesticated Game

California common carriers of wild game, including domesticated birds.
California common carriers of wild game, including domesticated birds.

There are several requirements for a common carrier to transport the carcass of domesticated Game Birds and Mammal. First, the carcass must be tagged with Domesticated Game Breeder’s Tag. Second, a tag or label has to be attached to the package. The tag or label must include the name of the person who (a) has the game breeder’s license, (b) killed the game, (c) has it on consignment, and/or (d) tagged it. It also has to state how many carcasses or parts of it are in the package. Finally, there has to be a statement that the animals were killed legally. For more information, see FGC § 3206FGC § 2400, and “Importing” below.


Import Documents

Bill of Lading or Declaration

California common carriers of wild game, including imports.
California common carriers of wild game, including imports.

There are several requirements for a common carrier to ship bird and mammals into California. First, the bird or mammal had to be taken legally. Second, the customer has to have legal possession of the animal. Third, there  either has be a “bill of lading” or an appropriate declaration from the CDFW. For more information, see FGC § 2353(b).

Food Supply Exception

Birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, or amphibians legally taken and legally possessed outside of the State may be imported into this state and possessed without a declaration as supplies carried into this State by common carriers for use as food for the passengers. See FGC § 2353(b).

Game Birds Raised Outside of the State

For a common carrier to import a domesticate game bird (or part) into California, the carrier must attach an appropriate label to the package. The label must include the the names and addresses of the consignor and consignee. Second, it must show the number and kinds of carcasses or parts. Finally, it must say that the contents are carcasses or parts of domesticated game birds raised outside this State. See FGC § 2401.

License

Federal laws for wildlife to not require an Import/Export License. Also, see 50 CFR 14.91(c)(10).


Inspection

If a common carrier has possession of a bird or mammal, the CDFW can inspect the contents of the box or package. See FGC § 1006(b).


Marine Mammals

A common carrier can transport live marine mammals, but it requires a lot of paperwork. First, there has to be a complete description of the manner of transportation, care and maintenance. It must include the type, size, and construction of the container or artificial environment. Second, there has to be a description of the feeding and sanitation arrangements. Third, there must be a statement of the applicant’s qualifications and previous experience in caring for and handling captive marine mammals. Fourth, there must be a statement of  qualifications for the common carrier or agent that it will use to transport the animal. Finally, a licensed veterinarian knowledgeable in the field of marine mammals must provide a written certification. It has to say that the vet personally reviewed the arrangements for transporting and maintaining the animals. It has to include the vet’s opinion that the arrangements are adequate to provide for the wellbeing of the animal. See 50 CFR § 18.31(a)(3).


Packages

When a common carrier ships wild game, the outside of the package must have clear marks with the following information. First, it must include the name and address of the customer and shipper. (The “consignee” is the customer.) The package must also include accurate descriptions of the number and kind of each species. Also, see 50 CFR § 20.25, § 20.44 [re transport within the U.S], § 20.53 [re import], and § 20.66 [re export] as well as FGC § 2348(a).


Violations

It’s illegal for a common carrier (or his or her agent) to transport any of the following.

California common carriers of wild game, including violations.
California common carriers of wild game, including violations.
  1. Live protected Nongame Birds. See FGC § 2225.
  2. Live resident or Migratory Game Birds for which there is no open season. See FGC § 2225.
  3. More than a hunter’s Daily Bag or Possession Limits of birds or mammals. See FGC §§ 2346 and 2347.
  4. Any protected Nongame Bird for which there is no open season unless specifically authorized. See FGC § 2352.
  5. Any resident or Migratory Game Bird for which there is no open season unless specifically authorized. See FGC § 2352.

While we try to fetch up all hunting regulations for California common carriers of wild game, we might miss a few or make a typo. If so, please leave a comment or question in the reply box below.

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